Just in! Videos: FAQ style, Educational, Instructional, Interviews and more.

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Just in! Videos, FAQ’s style and more

Tania has been requested multiple times to share her work over her lengthy career, give her opinion or support a person or organization. She is now sharing her work via Video FAQ’s or videos, from various individuals or organizations and conferences including the Secret Agent Society, Different Brains, Asperger Argentina’s first and second Symposium and conference on females on the Autism Spectrum, and Asperger Sevilla’s (Spain) recent Innagural Women on the Spectrum Conference and others. These videos can be found on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk_kFdaPkv4w0ieOgfR3IvA

If you like a video or feel it would help someone, please share the video, like the video, subscribe to Tania’s channel and hit the bell to be notified when the next video is coming out. You can leave your FAQ in the comments section below and Tania will read and select a question to answer in the future. Tania will answer the video and it will be uploaded to YouTube. Click on a picture below and you will be taken to her YouTube page, where you can learn more from FAQ’s, conference, interviews and more.

Tania also has her videos on Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/neurodiversityacademy

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More Videos coming here soon. Don’t forget if you have an FAQ, leave it in the comments section here or better yet on YouTube and you may see your question being answered by Tania in the future. And always remember to ‘Be Your Own Superhero’.

To contact Tania for in-person or Skype/Zoom fee-based impressions assessments, consultations, interviews, translations, problem-solving sessions and more, please email tania@aspiengirl.com

AspienGirl©

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The queen of self-deprecation

This is a recent FAQ on self-deprecation in neurodiverse females. As always, If you like it please share and leave your positive comments or other questions below. This video was made by the Neurodiversity Academy, founded by and funded by AspienGirl girl.com

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The Aspiengirl™, Aspienwoman and Aspienpowers Book Series

ABOUT THE BOOKS

Tania Marshall, M.Sc., psychologist and author, is releasing her book series to fill a massive gap in the market. Working daily in private practice there just wasn’t enough appropriate female resources to share.  Often, clients were requesting for resources specifically written for them. The result is the Aspiengirl™, Aspienwoman and Aspienpowers Book Series.

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What traits and gifts make this group of girls so unique and often misunderstood? I Am AspienGirl™ helps those with or those working with Asperger Syndrome by using a strengths-based approach to introduce the female profile of characteristics, traits and gifts. If you are looking for a book on the young female Autism traits then this is the perfect book for you.

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What traits and gifts make this group of women so unique and often misunderstood? I Am AspienWoman helps those with or those working with Asperger Syndrome or Autism by using a strengths-based approach to introduce the unique adult female profile of characteristics, traits and gifts. If you are looking for a book on the adult female Autism Spectrum traits, then this is the perfect book for you.

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Using positive strengths-based language, Tania Marshall showcases the gifts and talents of the many females that she has personally worked with. If you have been searching for a book that describes what Aspiens CAN do, CAN accomplish, and can BE, then this is the book for you. This book provides hope for any Aspiengirl or Aspienwoman’s future, by discussing and focusing on the unique combination of talents, strengths and gifts commonly seen in individuals with Asperger Syndrome or Autism. This book focuses on what this remarkable group of females can do and the positive future they can have, once they discover and focus on their strengths.

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Tania Marshall, M.Sc. is a psychologist who specializes in Autism Spectrum Conditions.  In particular, Girls and Women with Asperger Syndrome or High Functioning Autism. Tania is currently undertaking doctoral studies and is excited to be releasing her book series, designed specifically for females on the Autism spectrum and their carers, friends, family members and professionals. Tania currently spends her professional time divided between private practice, research, and writing and looks forward to releasing the next installment in her AspienGirl™ book series.

You can follow Tania here:

Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/taniamarshallauthorTwitter: https://twitter.com/TaniaAMarshall

Sign up for the Aspiengirl newsletter at http://www.aspiengirl.com
Tania can be contacted for assessment, diagnosis, intervention and support, in additions to interviews regarding her books. Contact her at tania@aspiengirl.com

Aspiengirl™ and Planet Aspien™ are registered and trademarked. Copyright 2013-14

Aspienwoman Mentor Project Interview: Singer and Songwriter Maja Nilsson

The Aspiengirl and Aspienwoman Project is devoted to showcasing females of all ages and from all walks of life, who live with a Spectrum condition.  In these interviews, I talk to mentor heroine Aspienwomen from a variety of countries about their lives, their gifts and talents and more. Singer/Songwriter and Asperchic Maja Nilsson joins me from Sweden to discuss her life, talents and more.

Tania: Welcome to the Aspienwoman Mentor Project. We are proud to have you join us? Where abouts in the world do you live?
Maja:  I live in Sweden
 
Tania:  How old are you?
Maja: 17
Tania:  You are a singer/songwriter/musician/music producer. When did you start singing and writing songs?
Maja:  I started writing songs at the age between 12-13 years old.
 
Tania:  When and how did you find out you have Asperger Syndrome?

Maja:  There was a classmate in primary school who had Asperger’s and I started to compare the symptoms to my own behaviour to see if I had anything similar.

Tania: What are Autism services like for you in Sweden?

Maja: A good example is that I’m in a special class for students with some kind of Autism diagnosis, we don’t have any homework as we do everything in school and go to lunch half an hour before rest of the school does. There is also a bad side that newspapers have blamed us for crimes and then “ordinary” people might get scared of us because we are seen as violent from the newspapers’ perspective.

Tania: I think it’s fair to say that the media has much power and unfairly pairs Autism and violence together. How do you think some of the traits of Asperger Syndrome have helped you in your career to date?

 
Maja:  Aspergers has helped me a lot to focus because of my sound sensitivity, I hear sounds all the time.
I also self diagnosed myself with Synesthesia, which means in my case I see sounds as dots and lines right in front of me which helps me even better to work.
 
Tania:  Synesthesia is a fascinating condition. Please tell us how seeing see sounds as dots and lines right in front of you which helps you work better?
Maja:  I literally see music in front of me which helps me know where to sing, for example.
Tania: That is fantastic and what a unique gift you have, Maja. It probably gives you an edge over other musicians. Now your first album is due out soon?
Maja:  There some songs left but I don’t have a deadline set (can’t handle stress that well).
Tania:  I believe Imogen Heap inspires you? For those that aren’t familar with Imogen, she is a UK born Grammy winning multi-instrumentalist and performer
Maja: Yes she has inspired me a lot by her way of sampling realistic sounds and also in her music genre. Another artist that also inspires me is the Icelandic singer Björk.
 
Tania: How do you think Aspergers has helped you in your career/life?
Maja:  It has helped me to become stronger as a person, from being teased some years ago to having supporting fans and friends who are curious about my music.
 
Tania: What advice would you give to other young females on the Spectrum?
Maja: I believe there is always a good solution to everything.
Don’t keep bad feelings inside you, then it would only hurt more.
Try to stay positive with who you are, because there is no one else like you in the world.
Tania: How can people listen to your music or buy your album?
Maja: My music is available to listen to and download for free on my SoundCloud account ( www.SoundCloud.com/MajaNOfficial )
Tania: Where can people follow you or find out more about you?
Maja: They can follow me on my website ( www.MajaNOfficial.Wordpress.Com ) or for smaller updates, on Twitter: Www.Twitter.Com/MajaNOfficial
 
Tania:  Maja, I want to thank you for your time and for being a seriously cool Asperchic role model and part of the AspienWoman Mentor Project. Thank-you for sharing your thoughts with us.
 
 
Maja: Thank-you for asking me to be a part of your mentor project.
Tania Marshall. 2013.  All rights reserved. Duplication in whole or part is explicitly forbidden. Thank you.

 

Professor Temple Grandin June 2013

Professor Temple Grandin June 2013

Nova Pathways to Employment Conference and Up Close and Personal Luncheon

Professor Temple Grandin is unquestionably the most famous person in the world with Autism who writes and speaks about Autism. I have admired her for many years and was absolutely honoured to meet and have a one-on-one chat with her about DSM5, her movie, piracy and Netflix, a strengths-based approach, employment, and more! She is also a very funny lady who tells professionals not to google themselves (after reading a variety of negative and/or misrepresentating comments about herself or what she has written or said), cracks jokes about her own brain scans and is highly entertaining and intelligent.

This past weekend Professor Grandin discussed life skills, strengths and employment as one of her biggest concerns for individuals with Autism. She asked me what I thought of the DSM5 changes and agreed that the term “Aspergers” should have been left inside the diagnostic criteria. She shared with me her thoughts on the unavailability of her movie “Temple Grandin” in certain countries, her thoughts on piracy and torrenting, Netflix, strengths-based work and assessment, employment and life skills. She told me she believes that those boys that are spending incredible amounts of time on video games, should start to learn how to make them.

Label this and Say What?! Building a Strengths-Based Descriptive Model for Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

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Say What?! Building a Strengths-Based Descriptive Model for Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

So, what’s in a word? The language and the words we use have power. Power to think about something in a certain way. It is time for a global revolution in the way we think about Asperger Syndrome. I believe it is time to move from a “deficit-based” model to a strengths-based one, which in addition to weaknesses, includes and assesses and describes people based on their strengths, skills, abilities, gifts and/or talents. Individuals with Autism have what we refer to as “spikey profiles” and a different developmental profile, meaning that often they may be behind in one developmental area, but ahead in another. In my clinical work, I have met people of all ages with weaknesses, yes, but also a stunning array of diverse abilities, talents and gifts, which has been overlooked. The deficit-approach has ignored strengths and contributed to the rampant identity and self-esteem issues that are seen in individuals with Asperger Syndrome. I’ve also met many people, including professionals who believe or have been led to believe, that individuals with Asperger Syndrome cannot contribute to society and/or work. This could not be further from the truth. I believe deficit-based diagnostic criteria and deficit-based approaches are partly responsible for this. It’s time for a strengths-based language, approach and positive strengths-based outlook for individuals with Asperger Syndrome, of all ages, sub-types and levels. The following is a work-in-progress, based on the descriptions relayed to me in clinical practice. I offer an alternative description after the bolded word “OR” . This list will be updated as time permits.

Too sensitive or too caring OR Emotionally Empathic, Sensitive

Selfish OR Independent

In his/her own world OR Becoming an expert in his/her special interest

Odd, weird, freaky OR Unique

Bi-polar OR Feels emotions intensely/deeply, An “empath”

Disorder OR A neurological condition he/she is born with

Co-morbid OR Co-existing (a part of a condition)

Anti-social, hermit-like OR Gifted in working with animals and/or children and/or nature

Unable to work in groups OR Excellent one-on-one or presenting to a group

Bossy OR Director/Leadership Skills/Spirited (Early intervention helps here!)

Clingy OR Affectionate

Compulsive OR Efficient and Attention to Detail

Conceited or arrogant OR Confident and Values Self

Crabby or irritable OR Communicate Needs

Dawdles OR Easygoing and Mindful

Defiant OR Strong Beliefs and Courageous

Demanding OR Assertive, Determination, Independent

Doodles OR Creative

Hyper, boisterous OR Active, enthusiastic, lvoes to move

Dramatic OR Emotionally Aware and Emotionally Expressive

Fearful or anxious OR Thoughtful, Cautious, Careful, Highly Sensitive

Freaks our, hides under tables OR Hypersensitive to sounds, lighting, smell, and sight

Talks too much OR has an extensive vocabulary, communicative

Finicky Eater OR Gourmet and Discriminating Tastes

Foolish OR Funloving

Obsessions OR Expert in an area

A brooder OR Serious

Disruptive OR Eager

Dreamy OR Imaginative

Explosive OR Dramatic

Forceful OR Determined

Giddy, Silly OR Good-humoured, joyful

Highly strung OR Enthusiastic

Impatient OR Passionate

Intense OR Focused

Loud OR Expressive

Moody OR Highly Sensitive

Not participating OR Observer

Picky OR Selective

Stubborn OR Peristent

Unfocused OR Curious

Foolish OR Funloving

Withdrawn OR Introspective

Fusses about food/clothes OR Specific Tastes and keen sense of self

Goofy OR Joyful and Entertaining, Great sense of humour

Impulsive OR Spontaneous

Loud OR Exuberant, confident and expressive

Hyperactive OR Energetic, full-of-life, creative

Naughty OR Independent and Exploring Boundaries

Nosey OR Curious Inquisitive Mind

Not Focusing OR Processing a variety of information

Quiet, Shy OR Thoughtful and Reflective Thinker

Rigid OR High Sense of order

Shy OR Selective about who they Value and trust, Reflective

Silly OR A Good Sense of Humour

Sneaky OR Inventive and Creative

Stubborn OR Determined and Persistent

Tattletale or Dobber OR High Seeker of Truth and Justice

Lacks empathy OR Possesses great emotional empathy, feels too intensely and experiences physical or emotional manifestations of other people’s energy, leading to meltdown or shutdown

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I believe that individuals with Asperger Syndrome have many Superpowers. The difference between bossiness and leadership skills is in early intervention (EI). EI makes a world of difference in supporting children/teens into being successful adults. Caveat: I am not saying that individuals challenges are ignored. I am saying that their strengths and talents need to be included in their profile.

Tania Marshall©. All rights reserved. Duplication in whole or part is explicitly forbidden. Thank you.

Moving Towards A Female Profile: The Unique Characteristics, Abilities and Talents of Young Girls and Teenagers with Asperger Syndrome or Autism

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The following list is an official working document consisting of the unique characteristics and traits of young girls and teenagers with Asperger Syndrome, or High Functioning Autism. This list comes from the many young females I have worked with over the years and currently work with. I have assessed, observed, diagnosed and worked with hundreds of girls and women of all ages. This document is based on my clinical anecdotal evidence and research by other well-known professionals. I will be modifying and/or updating this list from time to time. This list was written from my reflections, observations and experience, and is written in no particular order. No-one person needs to have every trait, and it is rare that a person would identify with every trait. ***This list is not a research-based female profile.  It is a descriptive anecdotal profile, much like the early day descriptions that Asperger, Kanner and Frankl described of the boys they observed. Please be mindful that research often lags behind anecdotal, observational and clinical work. Updated October 04, 2016

The following profile was created for older teens and family members who are considering a formal diagnosis and to assist mental health professionals in recognizing Asperger Syndrome or Autism in young females.

Females with Asperger Syndrome experience their symptoms in varying levels, so while some Aspiengirls are highly introverted, others are not. Females with Asperger Syndrome or Autism tend to be discriminated due to the wide spectrum of abilities or levels of functioning that exists. The majority of females do not receive a formal diagnosis until teenagers or well into their adult years. This list typifies many of the girls and teens I have worked with. This document is based on my clinical anecdotal evidence and research by other well-known professionals. I will be modifying and/or updating this list from time to time.

  1. Natural born leaders, seen by girls who are strong willed, often very serious, intense, independent, “My Way” and/or stubborn and bossy

  2. Intelligence. Bright with an Intense and insatiable curiosity about the world, people, how things work, what people are doing. May be seen in the persistent asking of questions. Usually high average to genius level, uneven profile of abilities

  3. Intense emotions and mood swings

  4. Highly Sensitive and sensory issues (visual, hearing, smell, touch, balance and movement, intuition). A feeling of being different to their peers.

  5. Social skills differences, which may be displayed in a variety of ways that vary from their same-age peers. For e.g., may be shy in social situations, have one best friend or be a floater (floats from one group to another and having superficial connections with others). A less developed or little understanding of facial expressions, social context, non-verbal body language, theory of mind.

  6. Self-taught. The ability to teach themselves or learn about anything they are interested in. A preference to direct their learning, rather than teacher-directed learning.

  7. A high sense of justice and fairness (empathy for the “underdog”) and adherence to rules about how the world and people should operate and/or behave

  8. Perfectionistic and high standards towards self and others

  9. Anxiety and/or fears, including negative all-or-nothing thinking and/or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or obsessive tendencies.

  10. Gifts or Talents, which may include but are not limited to singing (perfect pitch) and/or music, writing, reading, artistic creations, languages, self-taught, fast learner or other talent(s)

  11. Fine and/or gross motor difficulties, clumsiness, a lack of co-ordination

  12. Difficulties understanding the human social hierarchy, age groups and roles within a group, family

  13. Sleep issues (difficulty getting to sleep due to thinking too much and/or worrying about events that happened that day or what may or may not happen the next day), often not a morning person, tend to prefer staying up later at night

  14. Stomach issues (cramping, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, gas) are quite common, due to gluten, wheat and/or casein allergies/intolerances

  15. Hyperfocus. May not respond to their name being called due to being fully engaged in thought or an activity

  16. Hyperempathy, emotionally empathic and very caring (for e.g., may lead to bringing home stray or injured animals)

  17. Intense love and/or interest in animals, nature, celebrities, fiction, art, mathematics, languages and/or other cultures. May be obsessed with a person, real or fiction, in an unhealthy manner. Other common special or obsessive interests may include but are not limited to: philosophy, psychology, history (for example, Ancient Egypt or Rome, hieroglyphics), languages, Wicca, Vampires, Occultism, psychological profiling and/or criminology/serial killers/detective/FBI/forensic psychologist, science/space/NASA/Stephen Hawking, technology and programming, physical appearance (for example, Gothic, ultra-feminine, tomboy), fantasy, English literature, Law, make-up artistry, art, acting).

  18. Usually stand out as different from her peers, in terms of her dress (some girls are ultra princess-like in their clothing choices while others prefer to wear more comfortable and functional clothing

  19. Facial expressions may not match the situation or her mood (for example, smiling or laughing in a serious situation)

  20. May have interests that are mature/advanced AND/OR immature for her age (for example, a young child’s interest in english literature, opera or creative writing

  21. May be advanced in reading ability OR have trouble with reading comprehension

  22. May be advanced with mathematics/numbers OR have difficulties (dyscalculia)

  23. May have Irlen Syndrome

  24. May have Dyslexia

  25. May have Auditory Processing Disorder

  26. May have attention/focusing/impulsivity/hyperactivity issues (see Dr. Daniel Amen’s 7 types of ADD/ADHD at http://www.amenclinics.com/conditions/adhd-add)

  27. In social situations, she may be shy, quiet, even mute at times OR loud, very verbal and/or aggressive, imposing on other’s boundaries

  28. Has difficulty with asking for help when needed, saying “no” or asserting her own personal boundaries

  29. As mentioned previously, she may have trouble with her own boundaries, in addition to the boundaries of others

  30. May be naive, vulnerable and have a tendency to be taken advantage of. Often confused socially, saying she knows what to do in a social situation when she really does not. Girls appear to be better than boys at masking the traits of autism in social situations. However, girls are less able to do so in unfamiliar settings.

  31. May bring home stray animals, homeless friends or homeless strangers, much to their parents chagrin

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  1. May avoid demands that cause her anxiety (Pathological Demand Avoidance, see http://www.thepdaresource.com/)

  2. Usually has a low frustration tolerance

  3. May have a different voice, for example, younger than her age, talks “babyish” for her age at times, speaks in an accent or in a monotone voice.

  4. Avoids complying with requests from adults and may have difficulty with authority figures

  5. May be clingy with one or two friends and has trouble sharing her friends with other children

  6. May be a tomboy, a fashion diva or a princess. May or may not be interested in looking feminine.

  7. May not be interested in fashion at all or be obsessed with it

  8. Experiences social exhaustion or “social hangover”, from an inability to socialize as much as her peers are able to.

  9. Many females can look people in the eye and have superficial conversations with them

  10. Often well-behaved at school and has “melt-downs” at home (usually due to social exhaustion)

  11. May play with younger or older children

  12. May have language issues, particularly in semantic-pragmatics and expressive and/or receptive language

  13. May prefer to talk and/or play with boys

  14. May not apologize when she has made a social error OR may appease and apologize too much, even when she does not have too

  15. May watch and/or observe others playing before joining in

  16. May copy, minic or clone herself on other girls, also known as “Social Echolalia”, a mirroring of other children, giving her a superficial social confidence and skill-set by acting the part of another person. However, the complexities of the next step of unwritten social skills soon becomes apparent when she has to navigate the expectations and demands that come with reciprocal relationships and maintaining them. This is both confusing and exhausting for her

  17. May have imaginary friends and/or imaginary animals

  18. May spend more time setting up a play scene, rather than playing with the characters in the scene

  19. May be obsessed with fantasy worlds of fairies, witches, imaginary friends, imaginary animals, dragons, anime, or other

  20. May be highly visual, creative, more imaginative then her peers

  21. She may dominate when playing or talking with other girls OR be passive, quiet and “invisible” within the group. If she is dominating, her play tends to appear to be shared with others but she dominates and insists that others follows her rules and themes. If and/or when others refuse to be engaged she continues on with her own ideas or play. Her play tends to be mostly repetitive. If she is passive, she’s more likely to be compliant and may not come across as having social impairments. She may also be shy, embarrassed, coy, naive, innocent, unassuming, and hide or “camouflage” her difficulties, even lying about whether she needs or understands something or needs assistance or help. She is most likely to be described as “flying under the radar” or “blending in with the walls”.

  22. A tendency to collect information on people rather than things. May be interested in psychology, social work, nursing, teaching or helping others

  23. A tendency to ask a lot of questions, often challenging her parents or other adults, who are unable to provide her with the appropriate or the right answers; may correct the adult or teacher and point out their mistake

  24. A tendency to imitate other girls in order to initiate social contact but then have great difficulty maintaining and keeping the reciprocal friendship going. It is this part that often girls find stressful and they will often ruminate about the social situation, what they could have said or done differently, often late at night

  25. She may appear to have a rich imaginative world but the quality is atypical, tending to be a blend of fantasy and reality

  26. She may have an intense interest in the family pets, who may be her best friends, rather than other children or her peers

  27. May have motor tics, Tourette’s Syndrome

  28. May have a different quality of eye gaze/eye contact. May stare at others

  29. May not have a best friend, but be a “flitterer”, having many acquaintances, some to whom she may refer to as a best friend

  30. May have difficulty completing tasks

  31. May be highly organized, ordered and/or clean OR unorganized and have hygiene issues

  32. May follow other children closely, studying their mannerisms, actions, words, and so on

  33. Intense. There is no other word for it. AspienGirls have an intensity in everything they do. If they cannot do it right, do it properly, do it right the first time, they tend to refuse, avoid, and or express frustration/distress. When taught to persevere, to develop frustration tolerance, to manage their emotions, they are most often successful in whatever they pursue, to the point of becoming an “expert”.

  34. Superior photographic memory and weaker short-term memory

  35. Can be obsessive about people, especially if they feel or perceive that they have been “wronged”. This can get them into trouble at times for hurting others or taking revenge. May obsess over or stalk people. May have a misguided sense of justice that leads them to getting in trouble with other people, lawyers or the legal system/law.

  36. May question why they are “different” or what is “wrong” with them or why they can’t seem to “fit in” of feel that the “mothership dropped me off on the wrong planet and I’m just waiting for it to pick me up”

  37. Lack a clear sense of identity

  38. May be described as “serious”, “shy”, “odd”, “eccentric”, “adult-like”, “weird” in some ways, yet “babyish” in other ways

  39. A tendency to not be accepted by her same-age peers

  40. High likelihood of being bullied and/or teased, overlooked or ignored

  41. Intense dislike of disagreement, conflict, arguments, people yelling or shouting at them or around them. This them tends to an avoidance of conflict causing more serious communication difficulties. For example, this may be observed in a person who is unable to deal directly with a person they may have an issue with, but rather engages in talking or gossiping about their issue with that person with everyone else.

  42. An inability to handle and/or cope with stress, conflict and/or change

  43. An inner resilience, strength and ability (strong will and determination) to bounce back from stress and setbacks time and time again. This does depend on particular internal and external factors at play.

  44. Some strengths, abilities, talents and interests may include: enjoying fantasy worlds, fiction, acting, modelling, art, mathematics and numbers, music, song-writing, perfect pitch, writing fiction, languages and/or translating, caring for nature and/or animals, research, learning and studying, intelligence, teaching, helping others, science and medicine.

  45. May invade other’s personal space or stand too close to them or be unaware of boundaries

  46. May dislike people looking or staring at her. This is often a huge barrier for talented and gifted performers (for example, singers performing in front of others or crowds, actors being on the red carpet).

  47. May be perceived as being “just shy and quiet”

  48. Most often confused by the conversations of their teenage peers

  49. May walk on her tip-toes or have an “odd gait”, motor difficulties

81. May be very social, very loud, extroverted and make continual attempts to be part of a group. Her attempts are clumsy and her peers may see her as not quite fitting in. She lacks social skills and a social understanding to help the interactions go gracefully. Her peers don’t quite understand her social awkwardness and may be be mean to her, ostracize her and/or make fun of her, taking advantage of her naivety. She may appear to “flitter” from one person to the other or one group to the other, unable to have a typical friendship, due to smothering people or groups. Her peers take advantage of her, make fun of her and/or will be mean to her, saying they are her friend one day, but their actions prove otherwise. The issues revolve around girls being mean to her and cutting her from the group. She often smothers others and doesn’t understand the levels of friendship or social boundaries.

  1. Thumb-sucking may last well-past pre-school age, until 9 or even 10 years of age.

83.  Often as a teen, spending breaks/lunches alone in the hallways, toilets, library, or with a teacher, due to not being part of a group and/or having no friends.

84. May have Alexithymia, an inability to identify and describe emotions in the self 

  1. May have Synaesthesia, in particular mirror-touch synaesthesia. Research studies hypothesize that empathy is experienced by a process of simulation. So for example, when we see someone feeling happy or sad, the same neural circuits used to make them feel happy are activated in our brain. Since mirror touch synesthetes have heightened activation of mirror systems, it can be hypothesized that that these individuals may also experience higher empathy, and this has been confirmed by research in this area. Mirror touch synesthetes experience more empathy than non-synesthetes. A research study by Michael Banissy et. al  determined this by using the empathy quotient (EQ), consisting of three main scales: cognitive empathy, emotional reactivity, and social skills. Mirror touch synesthetes showed significantly higher EQ scores in emotional reactivity than in controls. However, synesthetes did not show higher scores in cognitive empathy and social skills. Thus empathy is multifaceted, and the tactile mirror system may not be fully responsible for the ability to empathize (For more information, check out Banissy, Michael; Jamie Ward (July 2007). “Mirror Touch Synaesthesia is Linked with Empathy”. Nature Neuroscience 10 (7): 815–816. doi:10.1038/nn1926).

References

Attwood, Tony (2006). Asperger’s and Girls. Future Horizons.

Kopp S, Gillberg C. Res Dev Disabil. 2011 Nov-Dec;32(6):2875-88. Epub 2011 Jun 12.

Gould, Judith and Ashton Smith, Jacqui. (2011). Diagnosis or Misdiagnosis? Women and Girls with Autism and PDA

FAQ: Why do your pictures include visuals of girls or women in superhero outfits? In my clinical experience and work, I never cease to be amazed by an Aspiengirls’ ability to bounce back from stress and setbacks time and time again. I refer to Aspiengirls’ abilities as “aspienpowers” because there is no other group of girls or woman I know of with the unique profile of abilities, traits and characteristics (aspienpowers) that enable them to be highly successful in their chosen careers and/or life, given the right environmental fit and support.

About Tania Marshall

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Tania holds a Masters of Science in Applied Psychology and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. She is a best selling author, child and family psychologist and Autism consultant. She is an APS Autism Identified Medicare Provider, a Helping Children With Autism Early Intervention Service Provider, a Better Start Early Intervention Provider, a Medicare Approved Mental Health Provider and a Secret Agent Society (SAS) Trained Group Facilitator.

Her areas of interest include: Gifted and Talented, Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Twice-Exceptionality, Highly Sensitive Individuals, Learning Disabilities, Performance Anxiety and Psychological Profiling

She regularly provides diagnostic assessments, support and intervention and divides her time between private practice, writing and research.

To enquire or book consultations, assessments, problem solving sessions and/or support, please e-mail Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

Tania has now completed the first two in a series of books on female Autism. She is now writing her third book entitled AspienPowers: The Unique Constellation of Abilities, Strengths and Talents of Females on the Autism Spectrum”.

Her book series is available for purchase at http://www.aspiengirl.com

To inquire about interviews, articles, workshops, presentations, or translations/translating of her books, please email Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

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Planet Aspien Book Series

Tania Marshall© 2013-2015. All rights reserved. Thank you.