Writing, writing, writing… training and webinars and videos PART I

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For those of you who have not heard from me in a while, I have been quite busy since becoming a paid Autism Ambassador.  Stepping into a more senior role of education involving writing articles, training, presenting and running webinars, seminars and courses is an important way of getting my strengths-based message out there. I am also an invited professional by the International Pediatric and Adolescent ROGD Working Group, working together on a new phenomenon within Autism, but not exclusive to it. As a part of my new roles, I am writing articles, books, doing webinars and courses and live coachings. I have written quite a few articles and delivered webinars as part of this new role.  I’m proud to be working with both of these large organizations and will be moving into a more senior role as an educator and author and reducing my clinical work.  As mental health changes move to a more online and app-friendly world, so will my work.

One-on-one consultations are still available via Skype or Zoom for an hourly rate. Please email Jo at tania@aspiengirl.com

My more recent work is as follows:

Summer 2019 International School Magazine: ‘Pupils with autism are twice as likely to be bullied – what can teachers do?’ I’ve included a link to the digital edition below. My article is on pgs 25-26:

https://issuu.com/johncatt/docs/is_21-3_97f69f894582ab

SEN MAGAZINE May 3rd, 2019

Best practice in supporting the learning of girls on the autism spectrum

https://senmagazine.co.uk/hone/artocles/senarticles-2/teaching-girls-with-autism

EPG

https://www.educationforeverybody.co.uk/blog/autism-bullying-EPG?fbclid=IwAR2glpgyNXnadndn1Knb2iwPqNZ5YyauA8b7IObdZyWNUEba3SCrJlJCH-w

November 23rd, 2018

GUEST BLOG: WHAT TO KEEP IN MIND WHEN TEACHING PUPILS WITH AUTISM

http://snip.ly/vgcqic#https://education-forum.co.uk/guest-blog-what-to-keep-in-mind-when-teaching-pupils-with-autism/

https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/1810/260897/Lai_et_al-2016-Autism-AM.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

Autism in girls can lie hidden

https://www.irishexaminer.com/lifestyle/features/autism-in-girls-can-lie-hidden-348736.html

4thwavenow.com

https://4thwavenow.com/tag/tania-marshall/

Quantifying and exploring camouflaging in men and women with autism

References to I am AspienWoman

2016

Meng-Chuan Lai 1,2,3, Michael V. Lombardo 2,4,5, Amber N. V. Ruigrok 2 , Bhismadev Chakrabarti 2,5, Bonnie Auyeung 2,6, MRC AIMS Consortium # , Peter Szatmari 1 , Francesca Happé 7 , and Simon Baron-Cohen 2,8

https://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/1810/260897/Lai_et_al-2016-Autism-AM.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y

13 April 2016

Autism in Australia: Tania Marshall

https://network.autism.org.uk/sites/default/files/ckfinder/files/Australia%20PDF.pdf

Autism in Australia: Tania Marshall

https://network.autism.org.uk/knowledge/insight-opinion/autism-australia-tania-marshall

Part I

AspienGirl: Embracing the Strengths of Women with Autism, with Tania Marshall | EDB 51

https://www.differentbrains.org/aspiengirl-embracing-strengths-women-aspergers-syndrome-tania-marshall-edb-51/

Part II

Gender & Neurodiversity: Recognizing the Diversity Within the Autism Spectrum, with Tania Marshall | EDB 54

https://www.differentbrains.org/gender-differences-neurodiversity-recognizing-diversity-within-autism-spectrum-tania-marshall-edb-54/

Discover Unique and Amazing Women on the Autism Spectrum

https://geekclubbooks.com/2015/12/i-am-aspienwoman-interview/

4th Wave Now

Guest post: For teen girls with autistic traits — a plea for watchful waiting

https://4thwavenow.com/tag/tania-marshall/

autismdailynewscast.com

http://autismdailynewscast.com/interview-with-tania-a-marshall-author-of-i-am-aspiengirl-part-1/

https://www.pdasociety.org.uk/resources/practitioner-and-clinician-resources

Jeckyll and Hyde or Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome?My Most Open And Vulnerable Blog Post Ever ~ My Journey To An Aspergers Diagnosis

https://www.hollyworton.com/my-most-open-and-vulnerable-blog-post-ever-my-journey-to-an-aspergers-diagnosis/

Gender Dysphoria

https://inspiredteentherapy.com

https://inspiredteentherapy.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/Resources-from-Inspired-Teen-Therapy.pdf

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About the author

Tania Marshall, a psychologist in private practice, is an Autism Ambassador for Education Placement Group, a specialist education recruitment business, and the author of I Am AspienGirl and I am AspienWoman.

globe taniamarshall.com

twitter @TaniaAMarshall

 @taniamarshallauthor

IG: @taniaamarshall

Tania’s YouTube Videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk_kFdaPkv4w0ieOgfR3IvA?view_as=subscriber

Tania’s Vimeo Videos:    https://vimeo.com/taniamarshall

Tania/s Vimeo On Demand

The AspienGIRL website can be found here www.aspiengirl.com

Tania’s website: http://www.taniamarshall.com

Tania’s Amazon Author page can be found here  www.amazon.com/author/taniamarshall

You can also follow on Facebook: www.facebook.com/AspienGIRL 

Twitter for AspienGirl: https://twitter.com/aspiengirl

Where to find Tania Marshall, Msc., books:

http://www.aspiengirl.com

ACER at

Amazon.com

Goodreads.com

http://www.angusrobertson.com.au

https://www.angusrobertson.com.au/books/i-am-aspienwoman-tania-marshall/p/9780992360948?zsrc=dsa-feed&gclid=CjwKCAjwza_mBRBTEiwASDWVvnQcxRfkN0UI2ZZmKWgI0-P9R76v-yzd1mNnIkPWHMrhZ2Gy5Qh1aRoCkoUQAvD_BwE


AS SEEN IN:

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Other Recommended Readings:

READINGS AND RESOURCES FEMALES WITH ASD Tania Marshall, M, Sc, MAAPI, Autism Ambassador, 2X best selling and Gold meal winning author © 2019

Bright Not Broken: Gifted Kids, ADHD, and Autism, Diane M. Kennedy and Rebecca S. Banks, the authors of Bright Not Broken, and the contributor, Temple Grandin

• Entire Issue of the Research Journal Autism – 2017, Volume 21(6) o Special issue dedicated to ASD in females

• Kreiser, N.L., & White, S.W. (2014). ASD in females: Are we overstating the gender difference in diagnosis? Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 17, 67-84. o

Excellent theoretical article Books on Topics for Females with ASD

Temple Grandin • Girls With Autism Becoming Women – Heather Wodis

• Girls Growing Up on the Autism Spectrum: What Parents and Professionals Need to Know about the Pre-Teen and Teenage Years – Shana Nichols et al.

• A Guide to Mental Health Issues in Girls and Young Women on the Autism Spectrum: Diagnosis, Intervention and Family Support – Judy Eaton •

I Am Aspiengirl: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Females on the Autism Spectrum – Tania Marshall

• I am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits, and Gifts of Adult Females on the Autism Spectrum (AspienGirl) – Tania Marshall

• Life on the Autism Spectrum – A Guide for Girls and Women – Karen McKibbin

• Women and Girls with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Understanding Life Experiences from Early Childhood to Old Age – Sarah Hendrickx

• Safety Skills for Asperger Women: How to Save a Perfectly Good Female Life – Liane Holliday Willey

• The Aspie Girl’s Guide to Being Safe with Men: The Unwritten Safety Rules No-one is Telling You – Debi Brown

• The Independent Woman’s Handbook for Super Safe Living on the Autistic Spectrum – Robyn Steward First-Person Accounts

Pretending to Be Normal – Liane Holliday Willey

• Asperger’s on the Inside – Michelle Vines •

Everyday Aspergers – Samantha Craft © S. Nichols, 2018

• Twirling Naked in the Streets and No One Noticed: Growing Up With Undiagnosed Autism – Jeannie Davide-Rivera

• Odd Girl Out: An Autistic Woman in a Neurotypical World – Laura James

• Working the Double Shift: A Young Woman’s Journey with Autism – Christine Motokane

• Aspies Alone Together: My Story and a Survival Guide for Women Living with Asperger Syndrome – Elaine Day

• Born on the Wrong Planet – Erika Hammerschmidt Books for Parents

• Parenting Girls on the Autism Spectrum: Overcoming the Challenges and Celebrating the Gifts – Eileen Riley-Hall

• What Every Autistic Girl Wishes Her Parents Knew – Autism Women’s Network Inc. Books for Girls

• May I Be Excused, My Brain is Full: Olivia’s Asperger’s Story – Krista Preuss-Goudreault

• I am an Aspie Girl: A book for young girls with autism spectrum conditions – Danuta Bulhak-Paterson

• M is for Autism – The Students of Limpsfield Grange School and Vicky Martin • M in the Middle: Secret Crushes, Mega-Colossal Anxiety and the People’s Republic of Autism – The Students of Limpsfield Grange School and Vicky Martin

• Middle School – The Stuff Nobody Tells You About: A Teenage Girl with ASD Shares Her Experiences – Haley Moss

• Lisa and the Lacemaker: An Asperger Adventure (graphic novel) – Kathy Hoopman Books for Young Women and Women •

• Women From Another Planet?: Our Lives in the Universe of Autism – Jean Kearns Miller

• From Here to Maternity: Pregnancy and Motherhood on the Autism Spectrum – Lana Grant Puberty and Sexuality

• What’s Happening to Ellie?: A book about puberty for girls and young women with autism and related conditions – Kate Reynolds

• The Growing Up Guide for Girls: What Girls on the Autism Spectrum Need to Know! – Davida Hartman

• Taking Care of Myself: A Hygiene, Puberty and Personal Curriculum for Young People with Autism – Mary Wrobel *Taking Care of Myself 2: for Teenagers and Young Adults with ASD

• Sexuality and Research Education for Children and Adolescents with ASD – Davida Hartman

 

Copyright Tania Marshall, M.Sc. AspienGirl™ 2019

Just in! Videos: FAQ style, Educational, Instructional, Interviews and more.

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Just in! Videos, FAQ’s style and more

Tania has been requested multiple times to share her work over her lengthy career, give her opinion or support a person or organization. She is now sharing her work via Video FAQ’s or videos, from various individuals or organizations and conferences including the Secret Agent Society, Different Brains, Asperger Argentina’s first and second Symposium and conference on females on the Autism Spectrum, and Asperger Sevilla’s (Spain) recent Innagural Women on the Spectrum Conference and others. These videos can be found on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk_kFdaPkv4w0ieOgfR3IvA

If you like a video or feel it would help someone, please share the video, like the video, subscribe to Tania’s channel and hit the bell to be notified when the next video is coming out. You can leave your FAQ in the comments section below and Tania will read and select a question to answer in the future. Tania will answer the video and it will be uploaded to YouTube. Click on a picture below and you will be taken to her YouTube page, where you can learn more from FAQ’s, conference, interviews and more.

Tania also has her videos on Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/neurodiversityacademy

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More Videos coming here soon. Don’t forget if you have an FAQ, leave it in the comments section here or better yet on YouTube and you may see your question being answered by Tania in the future. And always remember to ‘Be Your Own Superhero’.

To contact Tania for in-person or Skype/Zoom fee-based impressions assessments, consultations, interviews, translations, problem-solving sessions and more, please email tania@aspiengirl.com

AspienGirl©

Is Anorexia the New Female Aspergers?

Asperger Syndrome (AS) is thought to be the highest functioning form of Autism Spectrum Condition. Females on the Autism Spectrum are underdiagnosed and often come into a clinic with other mental health issues, many labels or diagnoses, some of which include: anxiety disorders, ADHD, sleep disorders, panic disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, bi-polar disorder, borderline personality disorder, eating disorders or schizophrenia.

Females on the Spectrum are generally much more social, really good at “faking” it, understanding non-verbal body language, working very hard to “fit in” and “pretending to be normal”.

Women tend to be much more social than men, observe and watch others more in order to learn what to do, learn how to hold their bodies, what to say and when to say it. All of these skills do not come naturally and an enormous amount of energy is put into these skills. Females are generally able to hold it all together during the day and then let it all out at night. At night, the “falling apart” may look like, jumping, screaming, flapping, outbursts or withdrawing into their caves.

Women generally tend to have better empathy and theory of mind skills. However, these theory of mind skills become affected by sensory issues, stressful situations, social situations, processing of verbal information, high levels of anxiety, conflict and/or arguments.

Of those that come into clinics, anorexia nervosa appears to be the most common eating disorder that females (21.7%) on the Spectrum tend to experience (Nichols).

What is the link between eating disorders and Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC)?

There is a overlap, possibly a genetic link between ASC and AN.

The lifetime prevalence of an eating disorder is 0.9%. ASD is highly over represented in AN (12-32%). Some commonalities between ASC and AN include:

1. Executive function deficits

2. Mood and anxiety disorders

3. Perfectionism

4. Rigidity in behavior and thinking

5. Theory of Mind Deficits

Autism Spectrum Characteristics that increase the risk of developing an eating disorder include:

1. Clumsiness and knowing where one’s body is in space

2. Body awareness issue, distorted image of body in space

3. Limited social insight; difficulty with understanding how others see their body

4. Stomach issues, a feeling of no appetite, bloatedness

5. A lack of sense of being hungry or thirsty

6. Medication side effects (SSRI’s, antipsychotic and associated side effects of weight gain)

7. Sensory processing sensitivities

8. Stress management

9. Transitioning

10. Picky eating

Where does a percentage of almost 1/3 of the population with AN having ASC come from?

51 women over 18 years were evaluated using formal interviews, developmental histories and 32% of those met criteria for ASC, but only 11% of them knew that they had ASC. Their families had no idea that they had ASC. The highest prevalence of personality disorders (OCD) were also present.

In terms of intervention and treatment, a modified treatment schedule is important due to learning difficulties, mental health issues including ASC, a balanced/different course load.

What is desperately needed is a routine global screening program for all females who come into a clinic with an eating disorder. It is critical to know if a client has an ASC or has symptoms of an ASC because the symptoms of ASC do not go away post-treatment. The eating disorder may be alleviated, however the symptoms of the ASC have not. This will help the client, their families and their treatment professionals.

Goals for treatment of an ASC and AN include:

1. Treating the sensory processing condition

2. Improving the rigidity and inflexible thinking processes

3. Improving the range of foods eaten

4. Rigid repetitive behaviors need to be replaced with more functional behaviors

5. Increasing and widening the range of foods eaten

6. Decreasing anxiety levels and improving depression levels

7. Work with the preference for sameness and routine

8. Improving sensory processing issues and desensitizing to aversive foods

Resources

https://nedic.adobeconnect.com/_a1094990891/p8era9wae5y/?launcher=false&fcsContent=true&pbMode=normal

S Baron-Cohen, A Jaffa, S Davies, B Auyeung, C Allison, S Wheelwright (2013)
Do girls with anorexia nervosa have elevated autistic traits?

http://docs.autismresearchcentre.com/papers/2013_BC_etal_Anorexia_nervosa_elevated_autistic_traits.pdf

Gillberg C, Cederlund M, Lamberg K, Zeijlon L: Brief report: “the autism epidemic”.
The registered prevalence of autism in a Swedish urban area. J Autism Dev Disord 2006,
36:429–435.

Eating Problems and Overlap with ADHD and Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Nationwide Twin Study of 9- and 12-Year-Old Children

The sociocommunicative deficit subgroup in anorexia nervosa: autism spectrum disorders and neurocognition in a community-based, longitudinal study

CAVEAT: My research is focused on females, due to the lack of research and information on the female profile

Tania Marshall 2013. All rights reserved.

Tania Marshall©. 2013.  All rights reserved. Duplication in
whole or part is explicitly forbidden. Thank you.

Professor Temple Grandin June 2013

Professor Temple Grandin June 2013

Nova Pathways to Employment Conference and Up Close and Personal Luncheon

Professor Temple Grandin is unquestionably the most famous person in the world with Autism who writes and speaks about Autism. I have admired her for many years and was absolutely honoured to meet and have a one-on-one chat with her about DSM5, her movie, piracy and Netflix, a strengths-based approach, employment, and more! She is also a very funny lady who tells professionals not to google themselves (after reading a variety of negative and/or misrepresentating comments about herself or what she has written or said), cracks jokes about her own brain scans and is highly entertaining and intelligent.

This past weekend Professor Grandin discussed life skills, strengths and employment as one of her biggest concerns for individuals with Autism. She asked me what I thought of the DSM5 changes and agreed that the term “Aspergers” should have been left inside the diagnostic criteria. She shared with me her thoughts on the unavailability of her movie “Temple Grandin” in certain countries, her thoughts on piracy and torrenting, Netflix, strengths-based work and assessment, employment and life skills. She told me she believes that those boys that are spending incredible amounts of time on video games, should start to learn how to make them.

Flying under the radar: Girls and Women with Aspergers Syndrome

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Flying under the radar: Girls and Women with Aspergers Syndrome

In Australia, approximately 1 in 100 children are born with an Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC). ASC is a recently defined lifelong developmental condition and affects people regardless, of age, colour, race or socio-economic status. It is now referred to as a spectrum condition, meaning that the condition affects the person in different ways, even though there are common areas of challenges across all people with Autism.
Aspergers Syndrome (AS) or High Functioning Autism (HFA) is a form of Autism, characterised by challenges in social communication and interaction and restricted, repetitive patterns of behaviour, interests, or activities, including sensory issues (DSM5, 2013).

Hans Aspergers, an Austrian paediatrician, originally described Aspergers Syndrome in 1944. He originally believed that girls were not affected. However, further clinical evidence led him to revise his statement. In terms of statistics, Kanner (1943) studied a small group of children with autism and found that there were four times as many boys as girls. Ehlers and Gillburg (1993) found the similar ratio of four boys to every girl, in their study of children in mainstream schools in Sweden.

Aspergers Syndrome appears to be more common among boys than girls, when the research is reviewed. However, recent awareness of genetic differences between males and females, and the diagnostic criteria largely based on the characteristics of males, are currently thought to be responsible for females being less likely to be identified. Attwood (2000), Ehlers and Gillberg (1993) and Wing (1981) all acknowledge that many girls and women with Aspergers Syndrome are never referred for assessment and diagnosis for AS, or are misdiagnosed, and are therefore missed from statistics and research. Many girls and women do not meet diagnostic criteria, as the criteria are based on the behavioural phenotype of boys. There exists a critical need for diagnostic criteria to reflect the female phenotype.

Questions have been raised about the ratio of males to females diagnosed as having an autism spectrum condition (ASC), with a variety of studies and anecdotal evidence citing a range from 2:1 to 16:1. Here in Australia, I have seen a rapid increase in the number of girls and adult women referred for a diagnosis and/or support.
The following are some of the identified different ways in which girls and women tend to present from boys (Gould and Ashton Smith, 2011; Attwood, 2007; and Yaull-Smith, Dale (2008):

• Girls use social imitation and mimicking by observing other children and copying them, leading to masking the symptoms of Asperger syndrome (Attwood, 2007). Girls learn to be actresses in social situations. This camouflaging of social confusion can delay a diagnosis by up to 30 years.
• Dale Yaull-Smith (2008) discusses the ‘social exhaustion’ that many females experience, from the enormous energy it takes pretending to fit in.

• Girls, in general, appear to have a more even and subtler profile of social skills. They often adopt a social role based on intellect instead of social intuition.

• Girls often feel a need and are aware of the cultural expectations of interacting socially. They tend to be often more involved in social play, and can be observed being led by their peers rather than initiating social contact. They often only have one or two close friends and/or may find boys easier to get along with.

• Cultural expectations for girls involve participating in social communication, often made up of social chit-chat or surface-type conversation. Girls with Asperger Syndrome find this type of communication exhausting, tending to desire having conversations that have a function to them. Girls on the spectrum are also are socially confused by teasing, bullying, and bitchiness, and the teasing that often occurs at school.

• Girls often misunderstand social hierarchies and how to communicate with others based on the level of the hierarchy that the person is on. This can tend to get girls in trouble with adults.

• Girls have better imagination and more pretend play (Knickmeyer et al, 2008), with many involved in fiction, and the worlds of fairies, witches and other forms of fantasy, including imaginary friends
.
• Whilst the interests of girls on the spectrum are very often similar to those of other girls, it is the ‘intensity’ and ‘quality’ of the interest which can be unusual. For example, many are very focused on their animals, celebrities or soap operas.

• Girls and women on the spectrum are generally skilled in one on one social relationships, but are uncomfortable and anxious in large groups of people.

• Girls may have great difficulty in attempting to explain their difficulties in social situations and/or groups. Instead, they may skip school, complain of headaches or stomach aches or refuse to go to school.

• Girls facial expressions tend to not match their moods. They may say that are fine, but on the inside they are unhappy, anxious or both.

• Girls tend to be more passive-aggressive (avoid social activities, refuse requests from others or refuse to complete tasks,), tend to blame themselves and/or internalise their feelings and anger and have less ADHD.

Girls on the autism spectrum are more likely to come to the attention of health professionals due to difficulties with anxiety, depression, eating disorders, behavioural problems and/or social skills challenges. The presenting problem then becomes the ‘diagnosis’, with the larger picture and explanation for feeling “different” is missed.

Women with Autism are most likely to have had a long history of misdiagnoses, often with borderline personality disorder, schizophrenia, anxiety disorder, depression, selective mutism, OCD, but somehow those labels just didn’t seem to fit adequately. Up to 42% have been misdiagnosed (Gould, 2011).

Many women with an autism spectrum condition are not being diagnosed and are therefore not receiving the help and support needed throughout their lives. Having a diagnosis is the starting point in providing appropriate support for girls and women in the spectrum. A timely diagnosis can avoid many of the difficulties women and girls with an autism spectrum disorder experience throughout their lives. Who should I take my child or myself to see? Ask your doctor, psychologist or paediatrician how many girls with Autism they have seen. They must have seen as least 50 girls with AS, due to the ‘social echolalia’ or the camouflaging of social confusion that females on the Spectrum engage in.

Three Common Female Autism Myths and Advice

1. Girls and women cannot socialise. Actually, many girls and can socialise quite well, just not for as long. They tend to suffer from social exhaustion or a ‘social hangover’ from longer periods of socialising. All persons on the spectrum need solitude to recharge their batteries.
Advice: Let your family or friends know that you need a solitude break, to allow you to recharge your batteries. Let them know that this is how your regain your energy.

2. Girls and women lack empathy. Actually, there are different types of empathy. Girls and women have high emotional empathy, being highly sensitive to the emotions of others, also known as referred emotion, the actual feeling of others feelings. This can be quite overwhelming for the person experiencing it. Being overwhelmed by feeling others emotions makes it challenging for them to process or ‘read ‘the subtle social signals (tone of voice, subtle expression on face)
Advice: Learn to accept and trust your intuition. Learning a variety of interventions to help manage or cope with high empathy is important.

3. Girls and women with autism cannot lie. Girls and women with autism can lie, but they usually do it badly. They tend to lie to the detriment of all concerned or lie as a quick fix because they do not know what to do, so they will deny, even when it’s plainly obvious that they are. In addition, females tend to tell the truth when it is not socially acceptable to do so or be truthful with their emotions, when it may not be the best time or place to show those emotions.
Advice: Social stories for “white lies” and the appropriateness of “emotional truth” are useful intervention tools.

About Tania Marshall

Tania holds a Masters of Science in Applied Psychology and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. She regularly provides diagnostic assessments, support and intervention.

Tania is currently working on her fourth book. She is co-authoring a book for professionals tentatively entitled “Assessment of Autism Spectrum and Asperger’s in Females: Comprehensive diagnostics and treatment planning for girls and women with autism spectrum conditions across the lifespan”.

To enquire or book assessments, problem solving sessions and/or support, please e-mail Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

Tania is also completing the first three in a series of books on female Autism. Her book series is available for purchase at http://www.aspiengirl.com

To enquire about interviews, articles, workshops, or translations/translating of her books, please email Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

book series2Tania Marshall©, 2013-2014. All rights reserved. Aspiengirl and Planet Aspien are trademarked. Thank you.