The queen of self-deprecation

This is a recent FAQ on self-deprecation in neurodiverse females. As always, If you like it please share and leave your positive comments or other questions below. This video was made by the Neurodiversity Academy, founded by and funded by AspienGirl girl.com

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Adult Autism/Asperger Syndrome Assessment in Females

Adult Autism Assessment in Females 
Updated 23/09/2016

Autism spectrum conditions, including Asperger’s syndrome, are challenging to identify in adults. Without appropriate assessment, many individuals may go undiagnosed, without appropriate support and treatment.

Many girls and women are going undiagnosed or misdiagnosed because the majority of the research has been conducted on males and there is a great need of research based on females compared to NT females, research based assessment tools for females and interventions for females. There is also a great need for these tools to be made readily accessible to professionals, in other countries and other languages. At present, there are few professionals in the world both trained and experienced in assessing and/or working with females on the Spectrum, across the lifespan. At this point in my career, I have worked with hundreds, closer to 1,000 females, from ages 18 months to 78 years of age, of various sub-types, symptomatology, mild to severe traits, a variety of levels of Giftedness, many professional performers (singers, musicians, comedians, actors, models), professionals athletes, professional artists, professional authors, high-profile individuals, all at different points on the Social Spectrum, some with gender dysphoria, some with sexual fluidity, parenting and being a mother, being in trouble with the law, stalking and obsessiveness, working in the sex trade, being sectioned into a mental health facility (and the experiences that go with that), have work-related challenges, and much more.

Females with Autism or Aspergers may be picked up for Autism in the teenage years with depression, anxiety or an eating disorder, if they are at all. Many females exist who are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed and continuing to have mental health problems because of this. Some are diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder, which may or may not be appropriate, although many have BPD traits, and I have worked with individuals who have both. For adults, no-one knew of Asperger Syndrome or Autism back in their childhood. So a comprehensive early childhood and teenage autobiographical account is an extremely important piece of an assessment. In addition, other perspectives from people who know the person very well are important. A comprehensive assessment of an adult can include a variety of assessment tools, depending on the person. It also involves childhood photographs, report cards and comments, parental and/or partner perspectives, formal assessment tool(s) and an exploration of abilities, talents and/or gifts.

 

The vast majority of women I work with are on the bright end of the Spectrum, and tell me their reasons for seeking a diagnosis range from self-understanding and awareness to improving their relationships, to improving their works relationships, to treating their anxiety and or depressive episodes. are not seeking services, support, nor government support pension or services. They are wanting to know why they have “felt different” for so long, wanting to know what career is best for them, wanting to know how to structure their lives. They don’t want o be on government disability not do they see they value in that. They like working, want to work and contribute.

Presently there are ZERO adult assessment tools for females, very little research that is based on females and no specific research based interventions for females. This is a crisis for females. It is challenging for females to find a professional or organization familiar with the female autism research, how to assess females and then how to support them.

When I conduct impressions assessments, the assessment of adults explore the areas of social communication and interaction, repetitive and stereotypical behaviour, sensory issues and abilities or gifts. Feedback is provided, recommendations, highly recommended resources and a “What Next?” discussion is also involved.

Generally speaking, my comprehensive adult diagnostic impressions assessments include the following:

An autobiographical account from earliest memories until approximately age 25 (usually 4-6 pages)
A written or typed account of why you feel you might have female Autism/Asperger Syndrome
A 10-page Life History Questionnaire to go over various traits, and also collect extensive life/educational/employment/psychological history, developmental information.
Where possible, I interview family members, a partner, or any other family member or friend who know the person very well. I also base my diagnosis on my direct experience of how the person presents during the interviews. Non-verbal body language, facial expressions, the sound of the voice and intonations are all assessed.
An interview exploring present day context and day to day functioning
An exploration of the following is important:
 
Family history, including one’s own children (if any), who may be displaying traits or be formally diagnosed.
History of mental health issues, previous medical, psychiatric, psychological and psycho-educational history (previous IQ test and/or educational assessments), previous diagnoses and/or learning disabilities
Reading of previous reports, letters, hospital admission notes, medical, educational reports
Educational history
Social communication and relationship/friendship history, use of social compensatory strategies
Identity or persona (s)
A thorough exploration of compensatory strategies
A sensory processing assessment
Work history
School report cards, school/teacher comments
Childhood photos from each developmental stage
Abilities, gifts, strengths, talents and/or skills (some examples include samples of poetry, art, blog, short stories, books, singing and/or musical ability, acting, comedy routine, degrees and/or thesis/dissertation work, samples of jewellery, clothing or costumes, website, awards and so on)
Over-excitabilities, sensory sensitivities, self-soothing or stimming behaviors, sensory processing disorder and/or synaethesia
An exploration of visual, auditory, taste, touch, smell, balance, movement and intuitive differences, synaethesia and hyper empathy.
1-3 other perspectives from other persons who know the person really well
An exploration of personal journal entries, autobiographical and/or blog entries
Results of specific adult Autism assessment tools and other tools, completed by the person and also dependent on the person being assessed and the context
Other conditions (for example,  Central Auditory Processing, Irlen Syndrome, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome,  Hypermobility type Syndrome, food allergies)
Formal diagnostic tool(s) depend on the context of client. Research has shown that both the DSM5 and the ADOS are not very good at picking up the subtle characteristics of females on the Spectrum.
It is imperative that professionals learn to ASK females the right questions. These questions will vary from questions that would be asked of males. This is because we research is finally beginning to catch up with clinical experience, telling is what we as clinicians have know for years, that males and females present differently, in quite a few ways. Giftedness also impacts on the presentation of a female on the Spectrum, so professionals need to be aware of all levels of Giftedness and how they affect the assessment process.
So, when someone receives a diagnosis, what then?

A positive assessment or diagnosis is just the beginning.It is never to late to receive a diagnosis and the benefits outweigh any disadvantages.

While my diagnosis is based on the current DSM-5 Criteria, it is by no means a cut and dry process. The DSM is a working document and as such, does not accomodate well to females on the Spectrum.

Diagnosis, ultimately from my perspective, is best done when in collaboration with the client (and their partner or spouse when relevant) as a way to inform, educate, reflect and empower.

An important  “What Next” section is very important, and may or may not involve the following,  again dependent on the person, their situation and context of their life. Discussions of the following may include:
Self awareness and understanding
Education and highly recommended resources (including the best academic books, websites, research, researchers, webinars, etc)
Attitude
Strengths
Challenges
Recommended helpful therapy
The Social Spectrum
Referral to other professionals, professional support groups, etc.
Many adults have lived and died not knowing they had Autism or Asperger syndrome. Some benefits of an adult diagnosis include:
Knowledge and self-understanding of oneself and also for family members, friends, co-workers and/or partners
Access to appropriate therapy, medication, support and services
An answer for past experiences and challenges
Permission to ease up on oneself
Possible prevention of other conditions or disorders (i.e., personality disorders, difficulties distinguishing between reality and fantasy), difficulties with work, the law and court system and/or suicide
Prevention of mis-directed treatment
Learning about how one thinks (see the Autistic Brain, by Dr. Temple Grandin)
Identifying strengths, abilities and gifts
There are both benefits and costs to disclosing a diagnosis. Disclosure should be considered thoughtfully and used only if there is is potential benefit.
Who should I look for to help me? How can I find someone to help me?
Today, there are few professionals in the world trained and experienced in assisting females. At this time, the most important factor to look at is “Does the professional have both experience and training in the area of female autism”? Are they aware of the inherent gender bias? What types of assessment tools do they use? What is involved in an assessment? Do they use adult assessment tools? (Yes, I have had two clients tell me that child assessment tools were used on them).
I have developed a database of professionals who work with females which can be found at and is being updated on a regular basis at http://taniamarshall.com/female-asc-professionals.html
Please contact me at tania@aspiengirl.com if you or you know of someone who would like to be added to this database.
Common Pathways to an assessment or diagnosis
Having a child being assessed or who is formally diagnosed with  Autism
Difficulties with work or a current relationship
Discovering and learning about female Autism, aka self-diagnosis
A family member has recently or in the past received a diagnosis
Stalking and/or becoming involved in other criminal activities
I have read your writings and book I Am AspienGirl and it fit like a glove. Can you provide an assessment for me?
Yes, Tania regularly provides comprehensive impressions assessments across the lifespan. The vast majority of adults (both male and female) Tania has assisted are wanting a self-diagnosis confirmed formally. She is also in touch with other professionals who work in this area and also regularly refers to other appropriate professionals at the appropriate time. She can be reached at tania@aspiengirl.com
I really identify with the writings available on female Autism but I am not sure I want a diagnosis? Is Tania available to for sessions other than assessment?
Yes, Tania regularly provides services which may focus on assessment, diagnosis, problem solving, the pros and cons of a diagnosis, the pros and cons of disclosure, career directions, managing stress, anxiety, sensory sensitivities, “What Next” after a diagnosis, the different types of Autistic thinking, gender dysphoria, social difficulties and social skills, relationship difficulties, synaethesia, hyperempathy and the topic of being an “empath”.
For more information about the adult female phenotype, the sequel to the eLIT Gold Medal Award winning I am AspienGirl, entitled I Am AspienWoman: The Characteristics, Traits and Abilities of Adult Females on the Autism Spectrum is in press and due for release September 2015 and is based on her blog entitled “Aspienwomen: Adult Women with Asperger Syndrome. Moving towards a female profile of Asperger Syndrome”

Tania A. Marshall is an award winning and best selling author, a 2016 and 2015  ASPECT Autism Australia National Recognition Awards Nominee (Advancement category) and a psychologist. Her first book, I Am AspienGirl: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Females on the Autism Spectrum, Foreword by Judith Gould, UK, is a Amazon best-seller and a 2015 IPPY eLIT Gold Medal Book Award Winner.

I Am AspienGirl has been translated into both Spanish and Italian (release dates of July and August 2015 respectively). Additional completed translations include: German, Japanese and Brazilian Portuguese. Other languages currently under completion include: Dutch, French, Norwegian (by SPISS), Hebrew and Chinese.

 

Tania has completed the sequel to I Am AspienGirl, entitled “I am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Strengths of Females on the Autism Spectrum, foreword by Dr Shana Nichols (lead author of Girls Growing up on the Autism Spectrum). The release was 2015. This book includes a section of 24 females, all diagnosed as on the Spectrum, showcasing their strengths and also offering important advice to others. Tania is proud to announce that her 2nd book “I Am AspienWoman” recently won an IPPY eLIT Gold Medal in the “Women’s Issues” category.

Tania is an Australian psychological society (APS) autism identified medicare provider,
helping children with autism (HCWA) early intervention service provider, a better start early intervention provider and an Australian government medicare approved mental health provider. She is also a trained Secret Agent Society (SAS) social skills practitioner.

Tania can be reached at Admin@centreforautism.com.au for clinic or Skype remote impressions assessments, consultations, problem solving sessions, skills acquisition and intervention, interviews, book translations, presentations or workshops. She divides her time between busy full-time private practice, research and writing her book series.
Tania’s other books include:
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Female Autism Infographics

Female Autism Infographics to share for awareness and education. More Coming

The following article is copyrighted and may not be posted anywhere without permission from the author.

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For more information go to:

http://www.aspiengirl.com

http://www.taniamarshall.com

To contact Tania regarding consultations, assessment, problem-solving strategies, Skype consultations, book distribution, interviews, book translations, publishing queries, please email her at tania@aspiengirl.com

Announcing I Am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Adults Females on the Autism Spectrum

I Am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Adults Females on the Autism Spectrum

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After “I Am AspienGirl” was released in June 2014, it went to #1 in 3 categories on Amazon. The AspienGirl team was inundated with emails, stories, messages and letters. Many of them were from females themselves or from their family members, their loved ones and professionals. We received pictures, poetry, art, short and long stories. We had people, of all ages, wanting to be a part of the Be Your Own Superhero Project. We received messages from a number of countries wanting to know more about female Autism, offering their translation skills to assist in getting the information made available in other languages and/or wanting to know where to go to start the process of an assessment. Messages came in from parents and professionals saying they were using the book to explain the diagnosis or as a reference/starting point for explaining or discussing certain characteristics. Many of the messages or testimonials coming in positively referred to the format of the book, in particular the use of images and verbatim quotes which combined together showcased particular traits, characteristics or talents.

What we learned was that there is a desperate need all over the world for more trained professionals, more adult female research based on females and comparing females with Autism to their neurotypical peers, more information regarding the internal experiences of a large group of females on the Spectrum, more information about the female sub-types, and a huge need for assessment tools, resources, intervention and support designed specifically for females. Current assessment tools appear not to be suitable or designed to identify particular features of Autism spectrum disorder/condition in females.

This book is written for four types of readers. First, this book was written for the general population (neurotypical people), to explain the internal experiences and the unique characteristics of adult females with an Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC). Second, this book is written for the female who may just be starting her journey to understand that she may too, be on the Spectrum herself. Many adults are unaware that they are on the Autism Spectrum. Third, this book is for individuals who are self-diagnosing or with a formal diagnosis who may feel this book may help explain their uniqueness and characteristics to themselves and/or to their loved ones through sharing it with family members, partners, friends and/or colleagues. Lastly, the book is written for professionals, to assist them in understanding the newly emerging Autistic female profile and in their work with their clients.

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I Am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Adults Females on the Autism Spectrum is written by Tania Marshall, MSc., and the second in the AspienGirl book series. This book continues where I Am AspienGirl left off, detailing the newly emerging female phenotype as it often presents in adult females. This highly visual book presents stunning images combined with verbatim quotes by females on the Spectrum, that combined characterize and illuminate the unique strengths and challenges of the this “lost generation” of females. The images and quotes highlight a range of areas including: early memories, cognitive/personality type, sub-types, social, education, sensory sensitivities, emotional, communication/language, work, common interests, gender, family, and relationships, strengths, challenges, stages leading up to and after diagnosis, important AspienWoman needs and an inspiring section of 25 real life AspienWoman Superhero Mentors headed up by Dr. Temple Grandin. Also included is a strengths based exercise and some important references/resources.

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Sample Page of I Am AspienWoman

In celebration of the upcoming release of I Am Aspienwoman, we are offering $5.00 off, from now until release day. Pre-order you copy now at http://www.aspiengirl.com/english/i-am-aspienwoman-paperback

Available in eBook, paperback and a stunning Hard Cover edition. Dont forget to use your $5.00 off Code: #aspienwoman

You can also sign up for the AspienGirl newsletter and/or become an affiliate of the book series and earn 10% for every book your refer

For all inquiries regarding in-person or Skype diagnostic assessments or consultations, interviews, presentation and/or translations, please contact Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

For furthur information:

http://www.aspiengirl.com

http://www.taniamarshall.com

Professional Interview Series: Award Winning Author Kathy Hoopman

This is the second interviw in my “professional” series, where I was recently honoured to interview best-selling author Kathy Hoopman.

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What is your background? You are originally from Toowoomba, right? How did you get from there to Dubai?

I was born in Toowoomba, where I lived for twenty years and studied primary teaching at the Darling Downs Institute of Advance Education (now University of Southern Queensland).  I married right out of uni and went to work in Brisbane as a teacher in Prince of Peace Lutheran Primary School which was so new, it was still a cabbage patch when I got the jobJ.   I taught full time until I had children then I moved into relief teaching whilst I started my writing career.  We moved to Dubai in 2003 with my husband’s work, and stayed until mid 2011.  Then we took a gap year and spent a year back in Australia doing renovations and catching up on family and friends.  We returned to Dubai in Sept 2012 and plan another three year stay. 

How did you become an author?

When I was a school teacher, I read many books to my classes and love the worlds that were created.  Finally I decided to create my own worlds.  At first I wrote novels; some were published and some weren’t.  But strangely enough my first book published was a book of plays based on Bible stories.  It was a ‘right time, right place’ book.  But then I became interested in Asperger’s and wanted to capture the positives of the syndrome in an Aspie character.  I will never forget the day I was at an Autism conference where Tony Attwood was speaking.  At lunch time I waited until the long line of people, wanting to catch his attention, dwindled, and I nervously told him about the novel I had just completed.  He was gracious enough to look at it and gave his endorsement and Blue Bottle Mystery was picked up by Jessica Kingsley who has published all my Asperger books since then.

You have written a total of 7 books, is that right?

I have fifteen books published in Australia, the UK, US and the UAE, with translations into ten languages.  Six deal with Asperger’s and one is on ADHD.

 All Cats have Asperger Syndrome and All Dogs have ADHD have been very successful. What do you think the main reason for this is?

Many books on special needs are quite long to read and can be full of medical jargon.  Although these books are essential, many people simply want a quick overview.  I think what makes All Cats have Asperger Syndrome and All Dogs have ADHD so successful is that in ten minutes a reader can understand the essence of these syndromes, both the negatives and the positives, and come away with a smile on their faces and hope in their hearts.

I have just read your latest book Inside Aspergers Looking Out and it is just as fabulous. This book is different in that it is for Neurotypicals, in terms of them learning about what it’s like to be Aspie. What made you to decide to write this book?

In Sept 2011, in my ‘gap’ year, I heard John Elder Robison (Look Me in the Eye) speak at the Brisbane Writer’s Conference.  I was moved by the entirely different way he saw Asperger’s and how he could explain it so that it was no longer facts, but life.  I was privileged to have lunch with him and I mooted the concept of writing a book along these lines – that is from the eyes of an Aspie.  Not having Asperger’s, this book took a lot of research and I listened to hours and hours of Youtube videos by Aspies, and joined online Asperger sites to get their insights.  By Feb 2012, it was finished and in the hands of my publisher. 

What is it like in Dubai, in terms of Autism and services?

I have to admit that I am out of the link here and have little contact with Asperger/Autism providers.  However, I understand that slowly schools and clinics are striving to incorporate special needs programmes and are beginning to employ specialists in these areas.  Unfortunately, many children do not receive the assistance required and many schools still refuse to take any children with special needs of any kind. 

Are we going to get a chance to read anymore Kathy Hoopman books?

I have dabbled with writing a teacher’s handbook on how to deal with Asperger’s in the classroom, but it is on the back burner at present.   Currently I am branching into a new area of writing and I am working on a children’s Christian book which is trying to capture the essence of the Bible in eighty picture book pages.  It is a fascinating and hugely challenging project.

Where can we buy your books?

Many of the larger book lines either stock my books or can order them in.  My distributor in Australia is Footprints Books http://www.footprint.com.au/ and all of my Asperger titles can be ordered through them.  Online stores like Amazon, Book Depository and Fishpond all have my works too.

Thank-you so much for this interview Kathy.

Thank-you Tania.

Tania Marshall©. 2013. Interview Professional Series. All rights reserved. Duplication in whole or part is explicitly forbidden. Thank you.

Moving Towards A Female Profile: The Unique Characteristics, Abilities and Talents of Young Girls and Teenagers with Asperger Syndrome or Autism

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The following list is an official working document consisting of the unique characteristics and traits of young girls and teenagers with Asperger Syndrome, or High Functioning Autism. This list comes from the many young females I have worked with over the years and currently work with. I have assessed, observed, diagnosed and worked with hundreds of girls and women of all ages. This document is based on my clinical anecdotal evidence and research by other well-known professionals. I will be modifying and/or updating this list from time to time. This list was written from my reflections, observations and experience, and is written in no particular order. No-one person needs to have every trait, and it is rare that a person would identify with every trait. ***This list is not a research-based female profile.  It is a descriptive anecdotal profile, much like the early day descriptions that Asperger, Kanner and Frankl described of the boys they observed. Please be mindful that research often lags behind anecdotal, observational and clinical work. Updated October 04, 2016

The following profile was created for older teens and family members who are considering a formal diagnosis and to assist mental health professionals in recognizing Asperger Syndrome or Autism in young females.

Females with Asperger Syndrome experience their symptoms in varying levels, so while some Aspiengirls are highly introverted, others are not. Females with Asperger Syndrome or Autism tend to be discriminated due to the wide spectrum of abilities or levels of functioning that exists. The majority of females do not receive a formal diagnosis until teenagers or well into their adult years. This list typifies many of the girls and teens I have worked with. This document is based on my clinical anecdotal evidence and research by other well-known professionals. I will be modifying and/or updating this list from time to time.

  1. Natural born leaders, seen by girls who are strong willed, often very serious, intense, independent, “My Way” and/or stubborn and bossy

  2. Intelligence. Bright with an Intense and insatiable curiosity about the world, people, how things work, what people are doing. May be seen in the persistent asking of questions. Usually high average to genius level, uneven profile of abilities

  3. Intense emotions and mood swings

  4. Highly Sensitive and sensory issues (visual, hearing, smell, touch, balance and movement, intuition). A feeling of being different to their peers.

  5. Social skills differences, which may be displayed in a variety of ways that vary from their same-age peers. For e.g., may be shy in social situations, have one best friend or be a floater (floats from one group to another and having superficial connections with others). A less developed or little understanding of facial expressions, social context, non-verbal body language, theory of mind.

  6. Self-taught. The ability to teach themselves or learn about anything they are interested in. A preference to direct their learning, rather than teacher-directed learning.

  7. A high sense of justice and fairness (empathy for the “underdog”) and adherence to rules about how the world and people should operate and/or behave

  8. Perfectionistic and high standards towards self and others

  9. Anxiety and/or fears, including negative all-or-nothing thinking and/or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or obsessive tendencies.

  10. Gifts or Talents, which may include but are not limited to singing (perfect pitch) and/or music, writing, reading, artistic creations, languages, self-taught, fast learner or other talent(s)

  11. Fine and/or gross motor difficulties, clumsiness, a lack of co-ordination

  12. Difficulties understanding the human social hierarchy, age groups and roles within a group, family

  13. Sleep issues (difficulty getting to sleep due to thinking too much and/or worrying about events that happened that day or what may or may not happen the next day), often not a morning person, tend to prefer staying up later at night

  14. Stomach issues (cramping, bloating, diarrhea, constipation, gas) are quite common, due to gluten, wheat and/or casein allergies/intolerances

  15. Hyperfocus. May not respond to their name being called due to being fully engaged in thought or an activity

  16. Hyperempathy, emotionally empathic and very caring (for e.g., may lead to bringing home stray or injured animals)

  17. Intense love and/or interest in animals, nature, celebrities, fiction, art, mathematics, languages and/or other cultures. May be obsessed with a person, real or fiction, in an unhealthy manner. Other common special or obsessive interests may include but are not limited to: philosophy, psychology, history (for example, Ancient Egypt or Rome, hieroglyphics), languages, Wicca, Vampires, Occultism, psychological profiling and/or criminology/serial killers/detective/FBI/forensic psychologist, science/space/NASA/Stephen Hawking, technology and programming, physical appearance (for example, Gothic, ultra-feminine, tomboy), fantasy, English literature, Law, make-up artistry, art, acting).

  18. Usually stand out as different from her peers, in terms of her dress (some girls are ultra princess-like in their clothing choices while others prefer to wear more comfortable and functional clothing

  19. Facial expressions may not match the situation or her mood (for example, smiling or laughing in a serious situation)

  20. May have interests that are mature/advanced AND/OR immature for her age (for example, a young child’s interest in english literature, opera or creative writing

  21. May be advanced in reading ability OR have trouble with reading comprehension

  22. May be advanced with mathematics/numbers OR have difficulties (dyscalculia)

  23. May have Irlen Syndrome

  24. May have Dyslexia

  25. May have Auditory Processing Disorder

  26. May have attention/focusing/impulsivity/hyperactivity issues (see Dr. Daniel Amen’s 7 types of ADD/ADHD at http://www.amenclinics.com/conditions/adhd-add)

  27. In social situations, she may be shy, quiet, even mute at times OR loud, very verbal and/or aggressive, imposing on other’s boundaries

  28. Has difficulty with asking for help when needed, saying “no” or asserting her own personal boundaries

  29. As mentioned previously, she may have trouble with her own boundaries, in addition to the boundaries of others

  30. May be naive, vulnerable and have a tendency to be taken advantage of. Often confused socially, saying she knows what to do in a social situation when she really does not. Girls appear to be better than boys at masking the traits of autism in social situations. However, girls are less able to do so in unfamiliar settings.

  31. May bring home stray animals, homeless friends or homeless strangers, much to their parents chagrin

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  1. May avoid demands that cause her anxiety (Pathological Demand Avoidance, see http://www.thepdaresource.com/)

  2. Usually has a low frustration tolerance

  3. May have a different voice, for example, younger than her age, talks “babyish” for her age at times, speaks in an accent or in a monotone voice.

  4. Avoids complying with requests from adults and may have difficulty with authority figures

  5. May be clingy with one or two friends and has trouble sharing her friends with other children

  6. May be a tomboy, a fashion diva or a princess. May or may not be interested in looking feminine.

  7. May not be interested in fashion at all or be obsessed with it

  8. Experiences social exhaustion or “social hangover”, from an inability to socialize as much as her peers are able to.

  9. Many females can look people in the eye and have superficial conversations with them

  10. Often well-behaved at school and has “melt-downs” at home (usually due to social exhaustion)

  11. May play with younger or older children

  12. May have language issues, particularly in semantic-pragmatics and expressive and/or receptive language

  13. May prefer to talk and/or play with boys

  14. May not apologize when she has made a social error OR may appease and apologize too much, even when she does not have too

  15. May watch and/or observe others playing before joining in

  16. May copy, minic or clone herself on other girls, also known as “Social Echolalia”, a mirroring of other children, giving her a superficial social confidence and skill-set by acting the part of another person. However, the complexities of the next step of unwritten social skills soon becomes apparent when she has to navigate the expectations and demands that come with reciprocal relationships and maintaining them. This is both confusing and exhausting for her

  17. May have imaginary friends and/or imaginary animals

  18. May spend more time setting up a play scene, rather than playing with the characters in the scene

  19. May be obsessed with fantasy worlds of fairies, witches, imaginary friends, imaginary animals, dragons, anime, or other

  20. May be highly visual, creative, more imaginative then her peers

  21. She may dominate when playing or talking with other girls OR be passive, quiet and “invisible” within the group. If she is dominating, her play tends to appear to be shared with others but she dominates and insists that others follows her rules and themes. If and/or when others refuse to be engaged she continues on with her own ideas or play. Her play tends to be mostly repetitive. If she is passive, she’s more likely to be compliant and may not come across as having social impairments. She may also be shy, embarrassed, coy, naive, innocent, unassuming, and hide or “camouflage” her difficulties, even lying about whether she needs or understands something or needs assistance or help. She is most likely to be described as “flying under the radar” or “blending in with the walls”.

  22. A tendency to collect information on people rather than things. May be interested in psychology, social work, nursing, teaching or helping others

  23. A tendency to ask a lot of questions, often challenging her parents or other adults, who are unable to provide her with the appropriate or the right answers; may correct the adult or teacher and point out their mistake

  24. A tendency to imitate other girls in order to initiate social contact but then have great difficulty maintaining and keeping the reciprocal friendship going. It is this part that often girls find stressful and they will often ruminate about the social situation, what they could have said or done differently, often late at night

  25. She may appear to have a rich imaginative world but the quality is atypical, tending to be a blend of fantasy and reality

  26. She may have an intense interest in the family pets, who may be her best friends, rather than other children or her peers

  27. May have motor tics, Tourette’s Syndrome

  28. May have a different quality of eye gaze/eye contact. May stare at others

  29. May not have a best friend, but be a “flitterer”, having many acquaintances, some to whom she may refer to as a best friend

  30. May have difficulty completing tasks

  31. May be highly organized, ordered and/or clean OR unorganized and have hygiene issues

  32. May follow other children closely, studying their mannerisms, actions, words, and so on

  33. Intense. There is no other word for it. AspienGirls have an intensity in everything they do. If they cannot do it right, do it properly, do it right the first time, they tend to refuse, avoid, and or express frustration/distress. When taught to persevere, to develop frustration tolerance, to manage their emotions, they are most often successful in whatever they pursue, to the point of becoming an “expert”.

  34. Superior photographic memory and weaker short-term memory

  35. Can be obsessive about people, especially if they feel or perceive that they have been “wronged”. This can get them into trouble at times for hurting others or taking revenge. May obsess over or stalk people. May have a misguided sense of justice that leads them to getting in trouble with other people, lawyers or the legal system/law.

  36. May question why they are “different” or what is “wrong” with them or why they can’t seem to “fit in” of feel that the “mothership dropped me off on the wrong planet and I’m just waiting for it to pick me up”

  37. Lack a clear sense of identity

  38. May be described as “serious”, “shy”, “odd”, “eccentric”, “adult-like”, “weird” in some ways, yet “babyish” in other ways

  39. A tendency to not be accepted by her same-age peers

  40. High likelihood of being bullied and/or teased, overlooked or ignored

  41. Intense dislike of disagreement, conflict, arguments, people yelling or shouting at them or around them. This them tends to an avoidance of conflict causing more serious communication difficulties. For example, this may be observed in a person who is unable to deal directly with a person they may have an issue with, but rather engages in talking or gossiping about their issue with that person with everyone else.

  42. An inability to handle and/or cope with stress, conflict and/or change

  43. An inner resilience, strength and ability (strong will and determination) to bounce back from stress and setbacks time and time again. This does depend on particular internal and external factors at play.

  44. Some strengths, abilities, talents and interests may include: enjoying fantasy worlds, fiction, acting, modelling, art, mathematics and numbers, music, song-writing, perfect pitch, writing fiction, languages and/or translating, caring for nature and/or animals, research, learning and studying, intelligence, teaching, helping others, science and medicine.

  45. May invade other’s personal space or stand too close to them or be unaware of boundaries

  46. May dislike people looking or staring at her. This is often a huge barrier for talented and gifted performers (for example, singers performing in front of others or crowds, actors being on the red carpet).

  47. May be perceived as being “just shy and quiet”

  48. Most often confused by the conversations of their teenage peers

  49. May walk on her tip-toes or have an “odd gait”, motor difficulties

81. May be very social, very loud, extroverted and make continual attempts to be part of a group. Her attempts are clumsy and her peers may see her as not quite fitting in. She lacks social skills and a social understanding to help the interactions go gracefully. Her peers don’t quite understand her social awkwardness and may be be mean to her, ostracize her and/or make fun of her, taking advantage of her naivety. She may appear to “flitter” from one person to the other or one group to the other, unable to have a typical friendship, due to smothering people or groups. Her peers take advantage of her, make fun of her and/or will be mean to her, saying they are her friend one day, but their actions prove otherwise. The issues revolve around girls being mean to her and cutting her from the group. She often smothers others and doesn’t understand the levels of friendship or social boundaries.

  1. Thumb-sucking may last well-past pre-school age, until 9 or even 10 years of age.

83.  Often as a teen, spending breaks/lunches alone in the hallways, toilets, library, or with a teacher, due to not being part of a group and/or having no friends.

84. May have Alexithymia, an inability to identify and describe emotions in the self 

  1. May have Synaesthesia, in particular mirror-touch synaesthesia. Research studies hypothesize that empathy is experienced by a process of simulation. So for example, when we see someone feeling happy or sad, the same neural circuits used to make them feel happy are activated in our brain. Since mirror touch synesthetes have heightened activation of mirror systems, it can be hypothesized that that these individuals may also experience higher empathy, and this has been confirmed by research in this area. Mirror touch synesthetes experience more empathy than non-synesthetes. A research study by Michael Banissy et. al  determined this by using the empathy quotient (EQ), consisting of three main scales: cognitive empathy, emotional reactivity, and social skills. Mirror touch synesthetes showed significantly higher EQ scores in emotional reactivity than in controls. However, synesthetes did not show higher scores in cognitive empathy and social skills. Thus empathy is multifaceted, and the tactile mirror system may not be fully responsible for the ability to empathize (For more information, check out Banissy, Michael; Jamie Ward (July 2007). “Mirror Touch Synaesthesia is Linked with Empathy”. Nature Neuroscience 10 (7): 815–816. doi:10.1038/nn1926).

References

Attwood, Tony (2006). Asperger’s and Girls. Future Horizons.

Kopp S, Gillberg C. Res Dev Disabil. 2011 Nov-Dec;32(6):2875-88. Epub 2011 Jun 12.

Gould, Judith and Ashton Smith, Jacqui. (2011). Diagnosis or Misdiagnosis? Women and Girls with Autism and PDA

FAQ: Why do your pictures include visuals of girls or women in superhero outfits? In my clinical experience and work, I never cease to be amazed by an Aspiengirls’ ability to bounce back from stress and setbacks time and time again. I refer to Aspiengirls’ abilities as “aspienpowers” because there is no other group of girls or woman I know of with the unique profile of abilities, traits and characteristics (aspienpowers) that enable them to be highly successful in their chosen careers and/or life, given the right environmental fit and support.

About Tania Marshall

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Tania holds a Masters of Science in Applied Psychology and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology. She is a best selling author, child and family psychologist and Autism consultant. She is an APS Autism Identified Medicare Provider, a Helping Children With Autism Early Intervention Service Provider, a Better Start Early Intervention Provider, a Medicare Approved Mental Health Provider and a Secret Agent Society (SAS) Trained Group Facilitator.

Her areas of interest include: Gifted and Talented, Autism, Asperger Syndrome, Twice-Exceptionality, Highly Sensitive Individuals, Learning Disabilities, Performance Anxiety and Psychological Profiling

She regularly provides diagnostic assessments, support and intervention and divides her time between private practice, writing and research.

To enquire or book consultations, assessments, problem solving sessions and/or support, please e-mail Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

Tania has now completed the first two in a series of books on female Autism. She is now writing her third book entitled AspienPowers: The Unique Constellation of Abilities, Strengths and Talents of Females on the Autism Spectrum”.

Her book series is available for purchase at http://www.aspiengirl.com

To inquire about interviews, articles, workshops, presentations, or translations/translating of her books, please email Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

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