Where are all the females with Autism or Aspergers hiding? Life As a Chameleon Part I

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In my two Gold medal award-winning books, I Am AspienGirl and I am AspienWoman, I discuss the female phenotype and how it presents differently from males. One of the areas I have been able to research and ask of my clients is, “how have you managed to hide your Autism all this time?” Other questions I ask them include:

I have worked with clients for over 20 years who have told me how they hide or not hide their Autism. Some autistic individuals can and some cannot or do not choose too. These behaviors are referred to as masking, camouflaging, assimilation, compensation, coping strategies, passing for normal, pretending to be normal or being a chameleon. In order to assist with females and males obtaining an assessment or diagnosis, I am pre-releasing a part of my book to assist professionals in recognizing Autistic females and males by asking the right questions.

The Compensatory mechanisms used by some Autistic people I have met and listened to are complex, even going so far as to use one behavior to cover up another. These questions and behaviors come directly from my professional experience as a psychologist working with individuals with Autism, Giftedness and Social Anxiety. Thank you to all my clients for sharing your stories with me.

The Compensatory Measures Checklist©, Marshall 2017, excerpt from my from my upcoming book. 

Do you feel different than your peers? When was the first time you ever felt different?

What exactly makes you feel different from your peers?

What is your experience of social interactions with your peers like?

Do you copy or mimic your peers (copy their voice or accent, words, and language or slang, hand and/or body gestures). Do you laugh when they laugh even when you don’t understand why you are laughing?

Do you take on a persona of always smiling and pleasing everybody?

Do you make better versions of yourself that based on peers in school, over time? How do you do that?

Have you ever read books on etiquette, social skills, facial expressions, microexpressions? Have you practiced them in front of a mirror? Have you practiced making more or less of a facial expression? In particular, have you purposefully changed you smile or facial expression to look “more normal”? Have you studied anatomy books, in particular, the facial muscle that matches with each facial expression (for example, knowing that a certain muscle is used in smiling and practicing using that muscle?

Have you ever used Botox or a similar cosmetic ingredient to make your face appear more natural, less angry or furrowed/worried?

Do you watch YouTube videos on social skills, self-improvement, and human etiquette in order to fit in?

Has a peer ever make a comment about your gait or other forms of behavior? If so, did you actively practice a behavior until you were able to make it look like your peers do when they behave that way? (for example, being told he/she had a ‘funny’ run and then purposefully practicing the running over and over again until it was perfect).

Have you watched movies to learn how to act with your peers? (for e.g, learn that you need to have a big smile and say hello to everyone because that is how people will like you).

Do you force yourself to make eye contact, look somewhere else on a persons face, look at their mouth or look at them for too long? Do you find yourself staring at people?

Do you hide some body language or facial expressions to fit in? (for e.g., sitting on your hands, twirling your hair instead of stimming or cracking your knuckles)

Do you spend the majority of your time thinking about what to say, how to act or behave, and/or analyzing social situations? Do you analyze what you could or should have said in a prior or past social situation?

Do you pretend to be shy and quiet and therefore avoid the “social drama” of having to navigate the social world of your peers?

Do you have a permanent smile on your face even though you are miserable inside?

Do others say you look angry when you feel happy or another emotion inside?

Have you or do you taken.take on the persona of a book, television, movie character or a celebrity?

Do you attend social situations, but don’t really want to (saying you will go to a party to get in with the “cool kids”). Do you do their homework for them to fit in? Do you do the groups work for the group to gaon social equity?

Do you write in your journal what you think you should say or do or not say or not do and practice them over and over, so you can use them in school? Do you have a list of sayings, slang, words from songs, movies or social media that you use to be “cool” or try to fit in?

Have you developed a special interest that is not yours but simply to “fit in” but you actually found that interest boring (for e.g, pretending to be in love with a certain pop star but you couldn’t care less about them)?

Do you participate in social events, parties, clubs that you do not want to in order to gain social currency? Do you use the skills you have learned from YouTube, social media, books, movies when you are at these social events? Do you find that you have to begrudgingly attend these events?

Do you use alcohol or drugs as a social lubricant? Does the use of drugs or alcohol allow you to be more social and/or have less anxiety?

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Do you utilize social media (Instagram, Twitter, Snapchat, Facebook, Reddit) to learn social nuances, how to interact socially, or how to hide your social awkwardness?

Do you act in varying ways depending on the social situation that you are in? Do others comment on or notice that you act differently depending on who you are with, the social context or environment?

Do you pretend to like the interests of whomever you are with at the time, however you know inwardly that you don’t like them? Do you make yourself look like you are interested in what your peers are saying, doing, how they are behaving, interested in their interests?

Have you ever had a girlfriend/boyfriend that you inwardly said to yourself, “Why am I with this person? I don’t even like them”.

Do you find yourself involved in friendships and/or relationships and wonder in your head why you are with them because you don’t really like them?

Do you feel there are times when you can be yourself? Do you feel you always have to be “someone else” to be in this world?

Is your headspace mostly filled with continual thoughts about what you should do next, do better, who to pretend to be like?

Do you have a habit of giving gifts to make and keep friends?

Has your family or another person supported you with social skills (enrolled you in drama, etiquette or social skills classes or a modeling school to learn deportment)?

How long can you socialize for before feeling tired?

Are there times where you actively find excuses not to attend events, parties, assembly at school, group activities? Do you often say “yes” to a social event and then make up a last-minute excuse as to why you cannot attend?

Do you purposefully go to the library, become a prefect, girl scout leader, homecoming queen, cheerleader, debate team leader (so you can give the directions or debate rather than socialize)?. Do you try to become the teacher’s helper at lunchtimes, hide in the bathroom, walk the hallways alone, join lunchtime clubs, wag school, so that you do not have to socialize with your peers?

Do you or are you reading or studying psychology, sociology, taking microexpressions and facial recognition training to learn to better yourself in terms of understanding people and socializing. Do you read social skills books, watch social skills training on YouTube or another social media platform?

Have you learned from your studies and them practiced how to ask people questions, listening skills and/or other social skills?

Are you overly aware of other people looking at you or pacing attention on you? Do you dislike attention? Do you feel like you spend the majority of your mental and physical energy on how you interact with others?

Do you feel like an ‘imposter’ in social situations?

To be continued in Part 2 and many more examples coming 

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I Am AspienGirl

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I Am AspienWoman

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The Compensatory Measures Checklist©, Marshall 2017, excerpt from my from my upcoming book. Thank you.

Copyright© Tania A. Marshall, www,aspiengirl.com, http://www.taniamarshall.com

 

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Just in! Videos: FAQ style, Educational, Instructional, Interviews and more.

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Just in! Videos, FAQ’s style and more

Tania has been requested multiple times to share her work over her lengthy career, give her opinion or support a person or organization. She is now sharing her work via Video FAQ’s or videos, from various individuals or organizations and conferences including the Secret Agent Society, Different Brains, Asperger Argentina’s first and second Symposium and conference on females on the Autism Spectrum, and Asperger Sevilla’s (Spain) recent Innagural Women on the Spectrum Conference and others. These videos can be found on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCk_kFdaPkv4w0ieOgfR3IvA

If you like a video or feel it would help someone, please share the video, like the video, subscribe to Tania’s channel and hit the bell to be notified when the next video is coming out. You can leave your FAQ in the comments section below and Tania will read and select a question to answer in the future. Tania will answer the video and it will be uploaded to YouTube. Click on a picture below and you will be taken to her YouTube page, where you can learn more from FAQ’s, conference, interviews and more.

Tania also has her videos on Vimeo at https://vimeo.com/neurodiversityacademy

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More Videos coming here soon. Don’t forget if you have an FAQ, leave it in the comments section here or better yet on YouTube and you may see your question being answered by Tania in the future. And always remember to ‘Be Your Own Superhero’.

To contact Tania for in-person or Skype/Zoom fee-based impressions assessments, consultations, interviews, translations, problem-solving sessions and more, please email tania@aspiengirl.com

AspienGirl©

The queen of self-deprecation

This is a recent FAQ on self-deprecation in neurodiverse females. As always, If you like it please share and leave your positive comments or other questions below. This video was made by the Neurodiversity Academy, founded by and funded by AspienGirl girl.com

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The Female Autism Crisis: Assessment and Diagnosis of the Neurodiverse

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Updated February 18th, 2017

This is a sample of the book entitled Behind The Mask and is therefore under copyright law. Behind The Mask give voice to neurodiverse females and discusses the assessment diagnosis and support of females on the Spectrum.

Tania Marshall, M.Sc. is available for diagnostic impressions reports, assessment, diagnosis and intervention, support and problem-solving sessions in-person and/or via Skype. All queries, please email admin@centreforautism.com.au

I chose to write my book series after numerous requests for information on the topic. I also chose to self-publish, so that I can regularly update my work, keep my work current with the speed and amount of the research in the area (a challenge to keep up with for a professionals in the area), keeping my work fresh, current and in real time, rather than a long waiting period and being out-dated.

Over my career, I have I worked with hundreds of neurodiverse, Gifted and Talented, and 2e individuals.They may have labels that consist of Autism, Aspergers, Non-Verbal Learning Disability, Twice-Exceptionality, Semantic-Pragmatic Language Disorder, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Bi-Polar Disorder, and many more. Irregardless of the ‘label’, these individuals have many significant strengths, gifts, abilites and/or talents, and this topic is discussed in ‘ AspienPowers’.

In working with neurodiverse individual across the lifespan, I have written and spoken about and or refer the ‘female autism crisis’. There are many factors involved, some of which include:  a lack of professionals trained in the area, gender differences, the female autism bias and the lack of assessment tools.  We are a long way from developing efficient tools for assessing neurodiverse girls and woman. The following slide is from the Recent presentation review of key measures, gender and autism at the 2016 XI Autism-Europe International Congress and shows that the ADOS/ADOS-2, the ADI-R and the SCQ favor males. This is a real problem and a crisis because these are the very tools that many professionals use when they assess females. They are sometimes a cause of females flying under the radar of a professional.

I have been referred many females who have had these tools previously completed on them and have not been given a diagnosis. This can be due to the tools inability to measure the subtle signs, client masking, compensatory mechanisms and strategies and/or the even the rigidness of the professional in using the tool or the over-reliance of using these tools versus asking the right questions and looking for the subtle signs in body language, facial expressions, asking the right social questions, evaluating areas such as context blindness, synaesthesia, Irlen Syndrome, sensory processing issues, and more.

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In assessing girls on the Spectrum, it is important to ask the right questions. I cannot emphasise this enough. There are many questions to ask and what follows are some examples. Keep in mind that high average to profoundly intelligent girls can tell you the socially acceptable answers that you as a professional want to hear, but they are unable to actually perform those unwritten social rules or if they can, they are not as fast at it as their peers or it comes off as just slightly awkward. You need to look at this subtle non-verbal signs which I will be discussing In an educational series.

Many girls and women with Asperger Syndrome or Autism have a tendency to be over-loyal and over-trusting, have a lot of emotional empathy, often just ‘seeing’ that a person needs help or saying they person needs help and taking things literally or not being able to ‘see’ the social context of a situation (for example, bringing home a homeless man because he has no home or food, yet not seeing the inherent dangers in doing this).

  1. What is bullying? What is teasing? What is bitchiness? How do you know the differences? When should you help someone? When shouldn’t you help someone?
  2. Sample questions in the area of friendship friendship should consist of: What is a good friend? What are some healthy ways of making and keeping friends? How long does it take to make and keep a best friend? Who are your friends? How do you know they are your friends? Do your friends try to get you to do things you dont feel is the right thing or that you feel uncomfortable with? (For example, do they try to get you to do your their homework, reports school work? Do they get you to buy things for them? Do they try to get you into trouble (for example, do they say they’ll be your friend if you do something for them?) What do you do at lunchtime? What do you do with your friends? What kinds of activities do you do with your friends? Do you prefer one best friend or a few friends? How long have you known your friend/friends for? Do they come stay over at you house and vice versa (if applicable). What do you talk about with your friend(s)? Professional Tip: Try to find out if the conversations are more one-sided or are they reciprocal, that is the conversation takes turns; it is a two way street rather than just a one person conversation involving 2 or more people.
  3. Sample Questions of play or hanging out may involve: How often do you play it hang our with your best friend/friends? Who initiates the play? Do you ask your friends to come over? Do they ask you to come over? Professional Tip: Often girls will text or cling too much to a girl, often driving them away.
  4. Does the girl or teen understand the social hierarchy? Do they understand how groups in school work? Do they understand the role the group members play? Why do you think the girls at school engage in these behaviors?
  5. Why is it important to keep a promise? Should every promise be kept?
  6. Why is it important to apologize when you’ve hurt someone? Professional Tip: Some girls adamantly refuse to apologize and some girls over-apologize.
  7. How do you know if someone is trying to get you into trouble? How do you know who you can and cannot trust as a friend?
  8. How do you know a particular person is safe to have as a friend? What kinds of clues might alert you that this person is dangerous? How would you know you are being taken advantage of?
  9. What are boundaries? How do you enforce a boundary?
  10. Do you prefer one-on-one friendships or hanging out in a group?
  11. Do you feel anxious around other girls? Girls often internalize their anxiety and can hide it very well. For those girls that are unable to “hold it in”, they may receive a diagnosis earlier than other girls. Remember that is it common for girls to be unable to explain why they are having difficulty in a social situation. They do often discuss not feeling well or may speak of feeling sick, feeling nervous or scared. They may often be in the sick bay.
  12. How long can you socialize for? Do you feel like you need a break? Does socializing make you tired?
  13. Teenagers with Aspergers often have eating disorders, an escalation of anxiety and depression and/or self-harm. Asking these questions is important. Investigating self-harm is also important. Girls are very good at hiding their cutting. Demand Avoidance is commonly seen in girls and women with Aspergers. Avoiding demands is caused by anxiety and/or not knowing how to do the task at hand and /or being embarrassed or socially anxious about a task. This is context-dependent and can look like making up excuses as to why she cannot do something that you know she can do to refusal to do something asked of her to refusing to comply with requests by an adult to avoiding the social playground.
  14. Many girl and women have a flat affect on their face, so that family members or professionals cannot tell how they are feeling.
  15. Some girls and women have Alexythymia and/or Faceblindness. Most experience extreme emotions and some girls may receive a diagnosis earlier than others to their meltdowns and/or violence.
  16. Many, if not all girls and women mis-interpret social situations (for e.g., “none of the teachers or kids at school like me”). Upon further investigation/assessment, it is found out that the individual misinterpreted facial expressions and social context, in an assessment.
  17. An assessment should involve reading of the eyes to see how well an individual can read non-verbal facial expressions from the eyes.
  18. An assessment may include listening to a variety of different tones of voice to see if the individual can distinguish the underlying feeling behind the tone.
  19. An assessment should also investigate other senses (both sensory issues and emotional empathy or “empath” characteristics). These questions need to be asked in a certain way as many females are literal, so a careful exploration is essential. An investigation of synaesthesia may be warranted.
  20. An assessment should also explore social naivety, the differences between lying and ‘white lies’, ‘pink lies’, social diplomacy, social tact and theory of mind.
  21. For teens and women, how do you know when someone is flirting with you or wants to go on a date with you? Do you know how to diplomatically reject the advance of another person? Professional Tip: Assertiveness training is essential for many females.
  22. In relation to gender and sexuality, a smaller group of girls (and boys) feel confused by their gender, and this can range from mild to severe. A thorough exploration of this issue often finds the individual relating better to the opposite gender, with girls getting along better with boys, being androgynous and/or Tomboy-like, and boys seeing other females as very socially successful and appearing to have lots of friends. Sometimes, an individual in their search for why they are different or why the social aspect of their life are so much more work for them, then come to the conclusion, for a variety of reasons (the feeling that others do not like or accept them, they do not like themselves, always having that feeling of being “different” to their peers), that they may have been born in the wrong body (they may be able to have more friends or be liked more, feel more accepted, feel “better” inside their body, be happier within themselves and within their family, be socially better or more popular), if they change their gender or their sexuality. Rarely, does changing one’s gender or sexuality fix the underlying social communication and identity issues, including being bullied, ignored or excluded and/or self-esteem challenges. Depending on how rigid or black and white the person is in their thinking, this can be a challenging issue to work on with the person.
  23. An exploration of identity in teenagers and women is important. This is because, over time, an assimilation of other people’s characteristics traits, voices, accents, behaviors has occurred, in addition to what others and society expect of them and from them. This high price (masking) often leads to a complete loss of identity.
  24. Many professionals are not aware that females can and do make eye contact, do make superficial conversation for short periods of time, and can have friends.
  25. Many professionals are unaware of the variety of sub-type presentations of girls across the Spectrum, with the ‘princess’ or ‘supermodel’ type, and/or those with higher intelligence, being the ones to be least diagnosed or diagnosed at a much later age. They are often Twice-exceptional (2e) individuals and blend in very well.
  26. Strengths and abilities are often overlooked due to the “presenting problem(s)”. Once these are addressed, then can an individual’s true gifts (for example, perfect pitch, artistic creativity, acting, dancing, programming, languages, just to name a few) can be nurtured and evolve into careers.
  27. Individuals on the Spectrum can and do lie, just like anyone else does. They dont do it as well as their peers and the reasons for lying may be different
  28. In terms of friendships, females are able to make friends, however they can often have a challenging time keeping them.
  29. A females sense of justice and high moral compass can be a clue and some females have been known to take their enlarged justice glands too far in their causes.
  30. Females with social problems often use their intelligence (sometimes quite successfully) to compensate for their lack of social skills, often falling into leadership roles, caring roles, teaching roles, acting roles, lawyers, professors, amongst other, where social reciprocity is least expected and social scripts (and slides!) can be adhered too.

Briefly, what we need to be asking are the right questions, looking and searching for and asking about questions that have to do with social confusion, camouflaging (how are the hiding it?), compensatory mechanisms (strategies they use to attempt to fit in, hide their confusion), eating disorders, gender, sexuality (if appropriate) and identity issues.

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This is a sample chapter of ‘Behind The Mask’, and is therefore under copyright law. In Part I of this book, it  explores the narratives and themes of the neurodiverse female clients that Tania has worked with over the course of her 20-year career. Part II includes chapters on assessment, diagnosis, how to explain the diagnosis, what next and support and intervention. For more information on female neurodiversity, go to:

http://www.aspiengirl.com

http://www.taniamarshall.com

Copyright 2014-2017 © All rights reserved. Duplication in whole or part is explicitly forbidden. Thank you.

Autistic Women, Diagnosis, Disclosure and Mythbusting

Taken from I Am AspienWoman (2015), release date September, 2015

I Am AspienWoman, Foreword by Dr. Shana Nichols, is over 300 pages and covers the entire lifespan from late teens to the elderly woman. Included is a mentor section including 24 inspirational and motivational Autistic woman, headed up by Dr. Temple Grandin.

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A diagnosis does not always mean disclosure.  By this, I mean disclosure may not be helpful. It depends. In my work with women, I have had women who wanted a diagnosis just for themselves and planned to tell no-one (not even their partners family members), I have had people who have told the world, and I’ve had everything in between!  Disclosure can have positive or negative ramifications and it is context dependent. Once you have disclosed you cannot take it back, nor can you control how or what others will say or think. In an ideal world, it would be perfect if the workplace or educational institution or other people would act according to disability law or respond how you would like them to, but this is often not the case. It may or may not benefit you to tell people and the pros and cons need to be considered, even if a workplace says they are aware and accommodating of disability. What are the pros and cons of disclosure for you?

Be prepared that other people may not believe you

It is a common experience for women to be invalidated, disregarded and/or not believed after they disclose their diagnosis to family members, partners or friends. This is mainly due to a lack of education and/or awareness about Autistic females.

Other people may expect to see physical signs or behaviors to confirm to them that a woman is on the Autism Spectrum. They may compare her to the media stereotyped characters or the males they know or know of on the Spectrum. They may say inappropriate or upsetting things to the newly diagnosed, often coming from good intentions.  Other people on the Spectrum may not believe you or may say just as upsetting things. Educating others (by referring them to research or books) and self-advocating, where possible, may be helpful.

Be prepared for the stereotypes about females with Autism

In particular, educating others about how Autism in females presents and the sub-types. Some common stereotypes and myths regarding females include:

females are Tomboys, dislike make-up and clothing, don’t like fairies or the colour pink, females, cannot look at you and carry on a conversation, and more. In fact, the opposite is true. Whilst I have met some females like this, I have met many females who love pink, make-up, clothes, fashion and fairies. There is no one type of Autistic female. What are some scripts or responses you can have prepared ahead of time?

Another way of talking about a diagnosis without talking about the “A” word

Another way of discussing a diagnosis can be in the form of discussing characteristics, traits, abilities or challenges. For example, talking about neurodiversity and ‘different’ brains (just like there are different trees and flowers) can be a helpful analogy. Relating different trees or flowers to people gives others an understanding of different brain types. Learning to advocate for oneself is important and can be effective when done appropriately. The following are a couple of examples to get assist and reflect on:

“I’m the kind of person who likes to socialize for a little while but then I need a break to recharge my batteries”

“I’m the type of person who is really interested in talking about English literature and not so great with small talk”

“I’m an introvert and need more time alone than others so I can concentrate on my painting”

What are some ways you can explain your strengths and challenges? What are some ways you can advocate for yourself?

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Tania is available for in-person or Skype or other remote consultations, assessments or problem-solving sessions. She offers bulk billing and sliding scales where applicable. To book appointments or discuss and/or book availability for presentations, conferences, publishing, translation and media interviews or inquiries, please email Tania@aspiengirl.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tania Marshall is a best selling author, a 2015 ASPECT Autism Australia National Recognition Award Nominee (Advancement Category) and a 2015 eLIT Gold Medal Award winner for her first self-published book entitled “I Am AspienGirl : The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Strengths of Young Females on the Autism Spectrum”, foreword by Dr. Judith Gould.  The sequel to this book entitled “I Am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Strengths of Adult Females on the Autism Spectrum”, Foreword by Dr. Shana Nichols is available September, 2015. Tania is currently writing the third book in her book series entitled “AspienPowers: The Unique Constellation of Strengths, Talents and Gifts of Females with Autism Spectrum Conditions”. The Spanish version of I am Aspiengirl , entitled Soy AspienGirl is now available. Tania’s work has been translated and/or cited in numerous publications including Sarah Hendrickxs’ recent release entitled “Women and Girls with an Autism Spectrum Disorder” (2015), foreword by Dr. Judith Gould.

Tania currently works in busy full-time private practice, providing diagnostic assessments, intervention and support to males and females ages 2-76 years of age. Tania is an Australian Psychological Society (APS) Identified Autism Practitioner, a Helping Children with Autism Early Intervention Service Provider (HWCA), a Better Start for Children with a Disability Provider, an approved Medicare provider of psychological services and a trained Secret Agent Society (SAS) Practitioner.

20152017  All rights reserved Tania Marshall

20 Reasons for obtaining an Adult Autism Diagnosis

20 Reasons for obtaining an Adult Autism diagnosis

One of the most frequent questions I am asked is about the relevance of obtaining a formal diagnosis or formalizing a self-diagnosis. My 2nd book, I Am AspienWoman alludes to this very topic through powerful images, experiences, thoughts and feelings of many adult autistic women. There are many valid reasons for obtaining a diagnosis and the majority of women who receive one explain the benefits in the book. I  have included a couple of pages from the book and you can now pre-order I Am AspienWoman, available in eBook, paperback and hardcover, at http://www.aspiengirl.com You will receive $10 off if you order an I Am AspienGirl© and I am AspienWoman Combo. I hope you enjoy the book as much as I did writing it!

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20 reasons for a diagnosis

20 reasons for a diagnosis1

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Tania is available for in-person or Skype consultations, assessments or problem-solving sessions. To book appointments or discuss and/or book availability for presentations, conferences, publishing, translation and media interviews or inquiries, please email Tania@aspiengirl.com

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Tania Marshall is a best selling author, a 2015 ASPECT Autism Australia National Recognition Award Nominee (Advancement Category) and a 2015 eLIT Gold Medal Award winner for her first self-published book entitled “I Am AspienGirl© : The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Strengths of Young Females on the Autism Spectrum”, foreword by Dr. Judith Gould.  The sequel to this book entitled “I Am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Strengths of Adult Females on the Autism Spectrum”, Foreword by Dr. Shana Nichols is available September, 2015. Tania is currently writing the third book in her book series entitled “AspienPowers: The Unique Constellation of Strengths, Talents and Gifts of Females with Autism Spectrum Conditions”. The Spanish version of I am Aspiengirl© , entitled Soy AspienGirl is now available. Tania’s work has been translated and/or cited in numerous publications including Sarah Hendrickxs’ recent release entitled “Women and Girls with an Autism Spectrum Disorder” (2015), foreword by Dr. Judith Gould.

Tania currently works in busy full-time private practice, providing diagnostic assessments, intervention and support to males and females ages 2-76 years of age. Tania is an Australian Psychological Society (APS) Identified Autism Practitioner, a Helping Children with Autism Early Intervention Service Provider (HWCA), a Better Start for Children with a Disability Provider, an approved Medicare provider of psychological services and a trained Secret Agent Society (SAS) Practitioner.

© 2015-2017 All rights reserved Tania Marshall

I Am AspienWoman Book Testimonials, Coming September 2015 and available for pre-order at www.aspiengirl.com

I Am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Adult Women on the Autism Spectrum (Foreword by Dr. Shana Nichols) is the sequel to the best selling and IPPY eLIT Gold Medal Award winning I Am AspienGirl (2014), Foreword by Dr. Judith Gould. To pre-order, go to http://www.aspiengirl.com/english

The book is available in eBook, paperback and a gorgeous hardcover version and can be bought separately or along with I Am AspienGirl.

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Have you ever wondered about a friend, a partner, a mother, sister or daughter? Wondered why she has said she feels ‘different’? Wondered why some things are so easy for her yet other things that most people perform with ease seem so challenging? Out of step with her peers, she may struggle keeping friends and a job, yet she has multiple degrees. She may be a gifted singer, yet she struggles with social interaction and performance anxiety. Maybe she was told she was shy and just needed to come out of her shell. Told she’d grow out of her social awkwardness. Maybe she had or has an eating disorder. Maybe she has been given too many ‘labels’? She may have spent years going to counselors, therapists, doctors or psychiatrists, with no real improvement or answers. Maybe Autism or Asperger Syndrome was mentioned but she did not resonate with the male profile or even with the stereotypical female profile.

Bright from early on, she may have single-minded focus, sprinkles of anxiety, sensory and social issues, be gifted in art, writing, research or singing. Maybe she is ‘Aspien’, an adult female with Asperger Syndrome or Autism. She has a unique constellation of super-abilities, strengths and challenges. She may feel or say that she is from another planet. Maybe nothing so far has really fit in your search for understanding her. Maybe she herself has been searching for self-understanding, or maybe she has recently self-diagnosed and is struggling to obtain a formal diagnosis. She may have a child or children on the Autism spectrum or it runs in her family and she is now recognizing it in herself.

If you are looking for a book on the often perplexing and unique adult female autism spectrum traits, then this is the book for you. This book showcases the female profile in a unique format, presenting a combination of images and quotes to illuminate the newly emerging Autistic female phenotype. This highly visual format showcases what Autism is like for females, as spoken by females on the Spectrum and those that love or support them. This book is about awareness and education of the female phenotype.

Drawing from years of practitioner experience, Tania Marshall takes you inside the world of adult females with Autism or Asperger Syndrome. Current research supports an inherent gender bias with females being under researched. This book was specifically designed to be a ‘layman’s’ guide for the general population, professionals, family members, the education and psychiatric fields.

Foreword by Shana Nichols, PhD

“Having written an endorsement for I Am AspienGirl ®, and recommending it as a must read to anyone parenting or working with a girl on the autism spectrum (including the girls themselves), I was delighted to be asked by Tania Marshall to write the foreword for I Am AspienWoman®.

I began working regularly with AspienGirls in 2005, having developed ‘girls only’ social coping groups. At that time, there were no resources available for families that specifically addressed the issues faced by females, and limited research had been conducted with the goal of understanding the experiences of girls and women. Few clinicians had begun to specialize in this area, yet those of us who did knew that these girls and women have unique needs and that a subset of females present with behaviors and characteristics that can be quite dissimilar from their male counterparts. When viewed through a ‘male’ lens, AspienGirls and Women are often overlooked, missed, misdiagnosed, and misunderstood, resulting in a rallying call for the professional community to pay attention and work towards remedying the situation.

In recent years that call has begun to be answered. Over 15 studies addressing gender differences and the experiences of females have been published in professional journals in 2015 alone. Attendees at the annual International Meeting for Autism Research in 2015 were able to participate in a session devoted entirely to research concerning females on the autism spectrum. A number of clinical conferences with the goal of offering practical strategies and facilitating the understanding of females have popped up globally in the last two years, providing the opportunity to learn from professionals and from women on the spectrum themselves. Lastly, the number of books and resources that are available to families, professionals, and females has grown. I Am AspienGirl was a rich and unique contribution to this literature, and I am thrilled to say that I Am AspienWoman ® is equally creative and inspiring.

With its characteristic eye-catching photos and powerful quotes from members across the entire female autism spectrum community, readers of I Am AspienWoman will find no shortage of knowledge, illumination and encouragement – after all, an important message of the book is for women to be their own superheroes. I Am AspienWoman celebrates the strengths, triumphs, talents and beauty of females, yet does not shy away from a balanced discussion of challenges, concerns, and important yet often overlooked issues such as gender and sexuality, personal safety, mental health, and motherhood. Essential themes that run throughout include Identity, Connection, Validation, Self-Care, Inspiration, Strategies, and Optimism. Top tips from over 20 Real-life AspienWoman Super-hero Mentors offer a smorgasbord of suggestions and support.

The pages of I Am AspienWoman hold a diamond of a message for any reader. It may be big, life changing, and fabulously eye opening. It may touch your heart and whisper “I see you.” It may provide the much-needed words to explain, describe or share thoughts, feelings and experiences. It may open doors, or it may give a gentle push to close those that are no longer helpful. It may be a hint of Hope, or perhaps a spark of Superhero-ness. It may be all that is needed to get started, re-start or continue on the journey of becoming the best version of who you are: an AspienGirl or Woman, a family member, a friend, an educator, a professional.

As a field, we still have a long way to go in advocating for better understanding of female autism, educating and training professionals, developing appropriate assessments and treatments, and creating a community of support and inclusion for AspienGirls and Women. Given all that has happened in the last few years, I am encouraged that we are headed in the right direction. Thankfully there are those special books, like I Am AspienWoman, that act as a guide and an incredibly accessible resource. As with her prior book, Tania’s latest offering has not surprisingly leaped onto my recommended reading list.”

Shana Nichols, PhD
Owner, Director, Researcher                                                                                        ASPIRE Center for Learning and Development                                                             Author of ‘Girls Growing Up on the Autism Spectrum: What Parents and Professionals Should Know About the Pre-teen and Teenage Years’

“Tania Marshall has created a groundbreaking book. Most often we hear the voice of the parent or professional, at last we hear the voice of women with Aspergers. Aspienwomen can be totally inspiring! Thoroughly recommend.”

Carrie Grant
Vocal coach, judge and TV presenter
Judge, BBC 1’s Fame Academy and BAFTA Award winning “Glee Club.”
Presenter, The One Show
Author, bestselling book “You Can Sing”
Mother to two daughters on the spectrum
United Kingdom

“There is definitely a need for more information for individuals who get diagnosed later in life. Diagnosis as an adult can provide tremendous insight into why relationships were so difficult. When I was in college, I remember many older quirky adults who seeked me out and helped me. Today many of these people would be diagnosed with either autism or Asperger’s syndrome. One woman was the associate dean’s wife and she gave me many hours of emotional support during difficult social times in college.”

Temple Grandin, Author, USA
The Autistic Brain and Thinking in Pictures

In this sequel, to her first book Aspiengirl, Tania Marshall examines the topic of autism in women, utilising the personal perspectives of women themselves. Despite a greater awareness of autism more generally, autism in girls and women is only just beginning to receive wider attention and the majority remain undetected, in many instances leading unhappy unfulfilled lives and often struggling to survive. This ‘lost generation’ of women is only now beginning to have the nature of the condition and needs recognised. Despite the talents and qualities such women may possess, they largely remain disadvantaged and vulnerable. This is often compounded by a lack of self-awareness and by their families and a poorly informed professional community.

As with its forerunner the essence of this book is its attractiveness, readability and clarity. It will open eyes of the reader in so many ways and although adopting a positive tone throughout avoids trivialising or glamourizing the topic or pulling its punches. Tania Marshall does not shy away from difficult areas or topics and has sensible approaches to offer. I am sure it will have a wide appeal – from those women who are or suspect they may be on the autism spectrum, families and professionals in many fields such as employment, education, health and social support.

Richard Mills

Research Director, Research Autism, London

Hon. Research Fellow, Dept. Psychology, the University of Bath, UK

I have been fortunate enough to work with a number of young people and their families in the UK and Ireland during the last 20 years.  I am also lucky to be involved with practitioner research; previously developing our ‘saturation model’ for including young people with autism in mainstream education (Morewood et al, 2011) and most recently considering the impact of interventions through case studies (Bond et al, 2015).  This research is vital; however I always feel I understand most from listening to young people, hearing their stories and talking to their families.

AspienWoman is the latest book from Tania A Marshall, and a vital addition to the growing knowledge-base about females and autism.  The ‘first-hand’ accounts throughout the book support the outcomes of our research; a personalised approach is essential.  The comprehensive ‘real-life’ examples support a rapid increase in understanding and allow for a truly unique viewpoint; highlighting strengths and personal characteristics of the women who have contributed, skillfully linked and collated by Tania, drawing on a wealth of personal experience and expertise.

I am reminded of a quote one of our students, Megan told me once: ‘I feel rather positive about my Autism, because it is part of me and without it I would not be me anymore.’  Anyone reading AspienWomen will understand immeasurable more after reading it, as I have.  I am always learning, from our young people and their families; Tania’s contribution to this knowledge will have considerable impact, as I am certain that AspienWoman will for many, many others around the world.  Essential reading, if you are directly involved in working with young people, their families or women with autism, or if you just want to understand more about some of the amazingly talented individuals who have contributed to this amazing work.

Gareth D Morewood

UK Special Educational Needs Coordinator

Honorary Research Fellow, University of Manchester

Associate Editor, Good Autism Practice Journal

www.gdmorewood.com
“Once again, Tania has provided a visual conversation starter to demonstrate the wide and varied adult presentation of female autism. Featuring individual profiles of successful autistic women along with quotes from individuals and family members, this book will help to further increase the understanding that women with autism are out there – even if they are hard to spot”.

Sarah Hendrickx,
Autistic adult
Masters (Autism), Postgraduate Certificate (Asperger Syndrome)
Author of Women and Girls with ASD, Understanding Life Experiences from Early Childhood to Old Age. JKP, (2015)

“When reading Tania Marshall’s AspienWoman, the reader gets wave after wave of deep understanding about women with Asperger Syndrome, filled with affirmation, positive reinforcement and difficult facts softened with empathy.  This book is unique and sensitive and full of wisdom.  For those on the spectrum it will be like a breath of fresh air to be understood and lifted up. For those just wanting to learn more, it is an exciting journey full of revelation and hope. AspienWoman is not a book to read once.  It is a book to be absorbed over time.”

Kathy Hoopmann,

Author, All Cats have Asperger Syndrome, All Dogs have ADHD

The Essential Manual for Asperger Syndrome (ASD) in the Classroom

Tania, your book is a reflection of the bright and beautiful possibilities that await women on the autism spectrum. Many had said, “She will grow out of it,” but rather, your book shows that “We grow into it,” emerging from confusion and misunderstanding into a new appreciation of our unique and powerful profile. I am Aspien Woman is a celebration in word and picture, affirming our rightful place in the society in which we live!

Rachael Lee Harris

Psychotherapist specializing in Women and Girls on the Autism Spectrum.

Author of My Autistic Awakening: Unlocking the Potential for a Life Well Lived

As the parent of an adult son who was diagnosed with Aspergers after many years of misdiagnosis and assumptions, ie “little professor” “lazy’ and more + the spouse of a man who was diagnosed with Aspergers as well I enjoyed reading your book.

The layout of I Am AspienWoman is quite impressive. The photos are vivid. The self descriptive disclosures regarding living with Aspergers by individuals and family members provide a venue for other woman on the spectrum to identify with. The photos and self disclosures are uniquely reinforced with factual information regarding the bio/psycho/social characteristics of those on the spectrum by the author in a format that the laymen can understand. I Am AspienWoman takes Aspergers and living on the spectrum out of the clinical context and provides a human and real window into the meaning of living with Aspergers.

I Am AspienWoman focuses on the positive aspects of living with Aspergers. It does not focus on the deficits. For sure, this book portrays the challenges associated with being on the spectrum but the strengths that individuals possess due to having Aspergers is reinforced. This will be resultant in providing hope and  the reader perceiving themselves, or a family member who has Aspergers in a more positive light.

The unique combination of presenting bios of “real people”, challenges, and the strengths of individuals with Aspergers will provide a venue for not only appreciation of strengths but challenges that effect individuals on the spectrum as well. I Am AspienWoman cracks the heuristics of society at large and any misnomers regarding Aspergers.

Many different aspects regarding traits, characteristics, challenges  are portrayed which reinforce the individuality of individuals on the spectrum. As with neurotypicals, each individual possesses different traits, talents and personalities. Hence, this is not a cookie cutter diagnosis where everyone with Aspergers is talented in math or computers. 

Thanks Tania for writing a much needed and “human” book that many on the spectrum will seek out for positive role models and will cause  society at large to change their perception about individuals on the spectrum who they live, love, work and play with on a daily basis.

Mari Nosal M.Ed. Author

Ten Commandments Of Interacting With Kids On The Autism Spectrum And Related Commandments

When I first read I am AspienGirl last year, I knew immediately that we would be treated to sequels. I am AspienWoman takes up where AspienGirl leaves off, taking the concept through a beautiful age progression.  AspienWoman does not glamorize Asperger’s but rather gives a balanced, factual picture of the strengths and challenges that characterize this population. The short vignettes tell the stories of the lives of real people, told from both the perspective of AspienWomen themselves, and from those who surround them in life. Tania Marshall outlines common traits and needs of the AspienWoman, with which many women will identify.

This book is alive with pictures and stories of beautiful, successful AspienWomen. The focus is on the strength of those spotlighted, and includes personal tips for success from these role models to the reader. Reading the stories of this group of featured role models, it is clear that “different” does not mean “less”. Ms. Marshall also includes a section of ideas on how a professional might use I am AspienWoman to enhance the lives of women with Asperger’s.

I am AspienWoman throws a life line to young ladies dealing with a feeling of isolation or frustration due to Asperger’s Syndrome. Ms. Marshall offers a sense of community to this population, along with proof that success and happiness can be a reality for the AspienWoman.

 Linda Barboa, PhD

Author of:

Stars in Her Eyes: Navigating the Eyes of Childhood Autism

Tic Toc Autism Clock

Steps to Forming A Disability Ministry

And the Albert is My Friend series teaching children about autism.

Watch for AspienPowers: The Unique constellation of Gifts, Strengths and Abilities of Females on the Autism Spectrum, coming late 2015.

Aspienpowerscover

Book 3 of the series

Tania Marshall is a best selling author, a 2015 ASPECT Autism Australia National Recognition Award Nominee (Advancement Category) and a 2015 eLIT Gold Medal Award winner for her first self-published book entitled “I Am AspienGirl: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Strengths of Young Females on the Autism Spectrum”, foreword by Dr. Judith Gould. She divides her time between private practice, research and writing. Tania is an Australian Psychological Society (APS) Identified Autism Practitioner, a Helping Children with Autism Early Intervention Service Provider (HWCA), a Better Start for Children with a Disability Provider, an approved Medicare provider of psychological services and a trained Secret Agent Society (SAS) Practitioner.

Tania is available for Skype or in person assessments, support, intervention, coaching and problem solving sessions. Tania can also be contacted for interviews, workshops, presentations, conferences, articles, publishing inquiries and/or translations at tania@aspiengirl.com