I Am AspienWoman wins a 2016 IPPY eLit Gold Medal Award!

The AspienGirl Project is pleased to announce that the sequel to ‘I am Aspiengirl’ entitled ‘I Am AspienWoman’ recently won a 2016 IPPY eLit Gold Medal Award in the “Women’s  Category” in April. I am AspienWoman is the culmination of a blog Tania wrote a couple of years ago entitled ‘Moving Towards a female profile of Asperger Syndrome’, with close to 300,000 views, to date. That blog is regularly updated. You may purchase copies at http://www.aspiengirl.com, Amazon or other fine books stores.

AspienWomanApril25th2016

 

AspienWoman April Elit Award1

 

2016 Award Announcements

Tania spends her professional time in private practice. She provides diagnostic assessment impressions reports regularly (across the lifespan), and provides interventions and support. For more information regarding diagnosis and assessment, bookstore wholesale discounts, book contracts, interviews, translations, workshops and conferences, please email admin@centreforautism.com.au

 

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Jekyll and Hyde or Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome (PDA)?

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Updated January 3rd, 2016. This post will be updated on an on-going basis

I have written this blog specifically to educate, advocate and provide awareness for an unknown syndrome in Australia, called Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA) Syndrome.  Many children are misdiagnosed with other conditions and/or parents are sent on parenting courses that are ineffective or make things worse for these types of children.

Presently, Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA) Syndrome is not recognized in Australia and is not recognized by the DSM5. It may be confused with intermittent explosive disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and other disorders or conditions. It is extremely challenging to find support or assistance for PDA in Australia. Many professionals are unaware of PDA. However, the National Autistic Society in the UK has recognized PDA as a form of Autism (http://www.autism.org.uk/about/what-is/pda.aspx#). This is a most progressive and positive move.

Over my career, I  have worked with some of the most behaviorally and emotionally disturbed children (and adults). I have worked with a number of children and adults (in two countries) who have been described by their family members, school officials, educational consultants, as “naughty”, “Jekyll and Hyde”, “bi-polar”, “schizophrenic”,”possessed” or even “a devil’s child”. I have worked in private special needs school, hospital psychiatric, outpatient and inpatient and private practice settings. In one professional development session I attended, a psychiatrist suggested “these children needed to be thrown out the window on the drive by past school” (in order to help them overcome their anxiety). I have seen and heard it it all, and I can tell you, these children do not need to be thrown out windows and are not possessed by any “devil”, although they can and do behave in some very scary ways, at times.

Presently Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA) Syndrome is not recognized in Australia and is not recognized by the DSM5. It may be confused with intermittent explosive disorder, oppositional defiant disorder and other disorders or conditions. It is extremely challenging to find support or assistance for PDA in Australia. Many professionals are unaware of PDA. However, the National Autistic Society in the UK has recognized PDA as a form of Autism (http://www.autism.org.uk/about/what-is/pda.aspx#). This is a most progressive and positive move.

Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome (PDA) is a term by Elizabeth Newson, used to describe children and adults who have an extreme need for control that is led by high levels of anxiety. They have difficulty coping and complying with day to day activities and their behaviors are out of proportion to the task being requested of them (for example, a violent act over being ask to pick up a toy). They have a lack of sense of a social hierarchy and have been described by others as socially manipulative and having anger management difficulties, which may include growling, grunting, spitting, hissing, violence and/or swearing. They may have a “look” in their eyes that is indescribable and/or scary to the parents(S) and family members.

The word ‘pathological’ is used to describe the avoidance as impairing their ability to function. Avoidance is used in many ways and the strategies are manipulative in a social way to avoid a demand. I have seen children use distraction, a multitude of excuses, stories and/or lies, negotiation and arguing, screaming and biting, hostility, attacking other people and/or becoming violent, running away, hiding, engaging in highly embarrassing activities in public, withdrawing into a fantasy world and acting like animals, just to name a few strategies.

Socially, children with PDA appear to have better or more social skills, however they do not have full empathy. I have observed them use empathy to control and/or manipulate others or a situation, but there is a stark lack of emotion involved. They may use their intellect to manipulate others.

At times, these children can appear as though they are just like any other child and at other times, they can be extremely challenging. These types of children are extremely moody, highly anxious, love role play and pretending, may have sensory sensitivities, tend be be bossy and domineering, and may not realize that they are a child, in the true sense of a little person. Some believe they are animals, rather than human. If you believe your child has PDA, typical parenting or even Autism parenting strategies will NOT usually work.

If you think your child has PDA or traits of PDA please read the following books. I am also available to consult with by emailing me at tania@aspiengirl.com

There are specific assessment tools to assist with diagnosing PDA.

Recommended reading

Duncan M, Healy Z, Fidler R & Christie P (2011). Understanding Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome in children. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Fidler R, Christie P (2015). Can I tell you about Pathological Demand Avoidance Syndrome? London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

I had the pleasure of attending one of Dr. Greene’s conferences in North America and I cannot recommend his work enough.

Greene, Ross W. (2014). rec. 5th edition. The Explosive Child: A New Approach for Understanding and Parenting Easily Frustrated, Chronically Inflexible Children

Greene, Ross W. (2014). Lost at School: Why Our Kids with Behavioral Challenges are Falling Through the Cracks and How We Can Help Them

Greene, Ross W., & J. Stuart Ablon (2005). Treating Explosive Kids: The Collaborative Problem-Solving Approach.

 

Sherwin J. A. (2015). My daughter is not naughty. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.

Recommended  Resources

Dr. Greenes’ Centre for Collaborative Problem Solving

http://www.ccps.info/

Streaming Video or DVD: Explosive, Noncompliant, Disruptive Aggressive Kids at http://www.cpsconnection.com/store

You don’t have to wait for Dr. Greene to be speaking in your area to watch his one-day overview of the CPS model; you can watch streaming video or download MP4 video or MP3 audio formats.

Recommended Australian Resources

http://www.thepdaresource.com/pages/groups.html

If you know of a professional in Australia who works with PDA, please let me know and I will add them to the ‘PDA Professionals list’, by emailing me at tania@aspiengirl.com

Look for my new book on PDA and females, coming 2016

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Copyright, Tania Marshall, 2014-2016

Myths, barriers and reasons females may be unable to obtain an Autism diagnosis

 

Currently, I am writing two books, “AspienPowers” and “Behind the Mask”. Quite often, as I am writing, certain memories or themes from my years of work come to the forefront of my mind. In my clinic work with individuals who are discussing their history’s or reasons they are seeking a diagnosis, I have come across a variety of barriers (other than cost) to a diagnosis. I also discuss briefly in my second best selling book I am Aspienwoman that other people may not believe the person once they receive a diagnosis.

Briefly, these include:

“My doctor told me I am a professional working woman so I couldn’t possibly have Autism/Aspergers”.

“I was told I have children, am a good mother and am functioning quite well, so why would I want a diagnosis? He refused to refer me”.

“I went in for an assessment and they gave me child assessment forms to fill out. I couldn’t answer most of the questions”.

“The majority of professionals I called said they only work with children”.

“My psychiatrist said I make great eye contact and talk well with him, so I couldn’t have Autism/Aspergers”.

“The local Autism Society had no-one they could recommend who was trained and experienced in working with Autistic females”.

“The professional I went to see said I couldn’t have Aspergers because it is no longer in the DSM5”.

“The professional I see said I only have anxiety, depression and social anxiety which I have had all my life (from birth). I tried to explain the sensory issues, my Irlen Syndrome and my gender fluidity, to no avail”.

“Ï was told I am a professional actress, making money and working and that I did not fit the profile (the male profile) of Autism/Aspergers”.

“I was told I present too well to have Autism/Aspergers. I am a professional model and I love make-up, clothes, fashion design and shoes, but I have always had social problems. I was told because I am well  liked by others that I could not possibly have Autism/Aspergers”.

“I was told by a professional that Autism/Aspergers is a ‘male’ thing”.

“I was told I have Social Communication Disorder and that’s all. I know that’s not all I have, so I am going for a second opinion”.

“I was told I am too social and therefore it’s impossible for me to have Autism”.

“I didn’t/don’t know how to drop my mask (with my psychologist) and only managed to get an anxiety diagnosis”.

“I have spent so much time teaching myself social skills, reading books on social skills, going to drama classes, that no-one believed me until I saved my money up and saw someone who is both a psychologist (and has worked with many females) and an author (writes about females)  for many years”.

“My daughter met two of the 3 criteria on the ADOS but has no RRP’s, so she did not receive a diagnosis”

“They said my daughter has some traits but not enough, so she now has a label of ‘Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder'”

“My daughter is a Jekyll and Hyde and did not receive a diagnosis because she is so well-behaved at school”

To Be Continued…more coming soon

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For more information of female Autism, please go to:

http://www.aspiengirl.com

http://www.taniamarshall.com

Free webinar The female Autism Conundrum

http://www.autisminpink.net

To contact Tania for fee-based impressions assessment/diagnosis, consultations, media interviews/inquiries, workshops and.or conferences, book reviews, translations, please email Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

 

Copyright Tania Marshall, 2014-2016

Assessing the behaviors, traits and abilities of young females on the Autism Spectrum

Assessing the behaviors, traits and abilities of young females on the Autism Spectrum: For professionals and parents

Girls with high functioning Autism (Asperger Syndrome) often have subtler characteristics that lead them to be missed by professionals. Many (not all) are able to use compensatory strategies to mask their difficulties and these are learned from before they start grade school. Autism tends to be a condition of extremes; an either/or condition in which two girls who present quite differently can both be on the Spectrum. For example, one is shy, quiet and mute and the other is loud, has a lack of boundaries and talks too much. The both have social communication and interaction difficulties.

Girls on the Spectrum may present as shy, quiet and at times mute, taking a long time to warm up to situations or they may present as overly talkative, verbal and lacking boundaries.

The quiet girl can be described as passive, a follower, watching and observing her peers much of the time to learn what to say or how to act. She is very shy in social situations. The verbal girl is often dominating, described as “bossy and controlling”, often described as having to have the best at everything and have her own way. She dominates and controls social situations.

Both girls may not receive many birthday invites, prefer one or two close friends, prefer to play with younger or older children rather than their peers, prefer to talk to boys or have boys as friends.

The quiet type may be attracted to extraverted personalities who tell her what to do or are controlling towards her due to her passivity and shyness. The verbal type may be domineering and controlling in her interactions with others.

Why do girls who have an assessment not receive a diagnosis?

Females can and do make eye contact and can have superficial reciprocal conversations in initial interviews with professionals.

Females are reluctant to admit they are having difficulty and will say they have friends, that they know what to do socially, when they are actually socially confused

Females start learning, often from before grade school to camouflage their difficulties and pretend every thing is fine

Females will say everything is ok and there are no problems even in the face of contrary evidence or difficulties

Professionals are viewing the female as just a “shy” and/or “sensitive” child or a “hormone driven” teenager, when in fact they have Autism. Around the age of 12-13 are when the proverbial wheels may begin to fall off and the inability to cope comes to the forefront

Professionals may diagnose only the presenting issue (for e.g., anxiety disorder)

They may receive high scores on the ADOS but not enough for a diagnosis

The majority of assessment tools are based on males

Professionals are not trained in understanding the gender differences, the gender bias, the questions to ask, compensatory strategies and camouflaging techniques

Some clues look for in an assessment

The Social World

1. exaggerated facial mannerism or a flatter affect. Many girls I have worked with have a slight grimace to their smile. This is a clue that they may be having difficulties with their own non-verbal body language. Many childhood photos reveal either no smiling or a slight exaggerated smile or facial expressions

2. look for facial expressions not matching the mood or the situation being discussed. For example, it is common to observe smiling or laughing whilst talking about a situation that would usually be associated with a different emotion (and therefore a different facial expression and tone of voice).

3. many girls say they know what to do in a social situation but when asked, are not able to tell you what they would do or give an answer that leads to to believe otherwise. An investigation into levels and types of friendships and social skills often reveals difficulties

4. exaggerated non-verbal body language is often a clue. Some girls present in the clinic with body language that appears “odd”, unnatural or like they are acting with you in a conversation.

5. Many females are well-behaved (often too well-behaved) in school but the opposite at home (due to social exhaustion and holding it all in)

6. Many females are observed using behaviors or words from their peers, other people or television. They may copy, look like or act like others, taking on the characteristics, mannerisms, voice, sayings, of others.

7. Many females present in different ways depending on the situation and this can be confusing to family members.

8. Many females will tell you they know what to do in social situations, but the evidence is contrary and/or you will get the impression that they are confused or are not being truthful.

9. Some females may not apologize when they have made a social error and some females over-apologize due to being confused about social rules. Some females refuse to apologize even when it is plainly obvious it would be in their best interests to do so.

10. Many females are able to socialize quite well for small periods of time but them experience social exhaustion or a ‘social hangover’, needing solitude to recharge her batteries.

The Play World

1. Some girls have a preference to play with stereotypical boys toys, having no interest in dolls whilst others have an obsessive-like quality towards dolls and stereotypical girls toys (for e.g., collecting all barbie dolls).

2. Girls can often be observed spending the majority of their time putting together the scene of play, rather that actually playing. For example, spending the majority of time ensuring all the furniture, accessories and dolls are in the right place). They often have elaborate scenes of play set up and organized.

3. Whilst playing on their own, girls are often observed to be role-playing adults. For example, a girl may set up all her teddy bears bears, dolls, etc., and role play the teacher, doctor, nurse or other role. She may take attendance, give time-outs, write out lesson plans and/or teach class lessons.

4. Girls on the Spectrum are often far more imaginative than their peers. They are often observed pretending to be animals and/or imitating them. They may also have some difficulty distinguishing between reality and fantasy

5. A tendency to have imaginary friends and/or animals who are very real to the child, to the point that they may have table settings for them at the table, seats for them in the car, and so on.

6. Girls often spend more time playing with the family pets and/or on nature than their peers, having a natural affinity/gift in the areas of nature and animals. It is the intensity of the interest as compared to neurotypical peers that is key here.

7. May have obsessions with other people which can be observed as too clingy, not allowing the friend to have other friends, not giving them enough ‘space’, or obsessing over them

8. Females tend to have more avoidance traits and strategies when demands are placed on them

9. Some females may flitter from group to group in school not really having any real friends but giving the appearance of having friends, so that no one would pick up on this

Abilities, Gifts and Talents

Abilities, Gifts and Talents are plural due to the many females I have met who display multiple talents. These abilities often include:

hyperlexia/reading ability, perfect or near-perfect pitch, languages, art, performing arts (dance, acting/drama, singing, musical theatre, modelling, involvement in a band, comedy), the care of animals, mathematics, writing fiction and/or fan-fiction and/or poetry and/or songwriting, intelligence,

Mature interests may include interests advanced for her age (philosophy, psychology, opera, a language)

Immature interests may include an interest well past her developmental age (for example, my little pony, doll or teddy bear collections).

Some presentations

Some females present as more of a “tomboy” appearance (preferring an androgynous clothing style) and disliking make-up and sterotypical girls clothing

Some females present as a “ultra-feminine” or “princess” like appearance (love make-up, fashion, trends and shoes). they may spends time involved in shopping for clothes and/or designing clothes, perfecting the art of makeup and.or modelling

Regardless of presentation, a difference in terms of clothing as compared to her peers is usually observed. My screener which was the basis of I Am AspienGirlL The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Females on the Autism Spectrum is here:

https://taniaannmarshall.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/moving-towards-a-female-profile-the-unique-characteristics-abilities-and-talents-of-young-girls-with-asperger-syndrome/

A female autism assessment tool I often use in conjuction with other tools includes this screening questionnaire developed by Kopp and Gilberg and it is excellent.

THE AUTISM SPECTRUM SCREENING QUESTIONNAIRE (ASSQ)-REVISED EXTENDED VERSION (ASSQ-REV), by Kopp and Gilberg

Kopp and Gilberg found that certain single ASSQ-GIRL items are often much more typical of girls than of boys with ASC. These items include “avoids demands”, “very determined” and “interacts mostly with younger children”. The ASSQ-REV is a new assessment tool that includes a set of “girl” items.

ASSQ-GIRL, 18 new screening items believed to tap into the autism phenotype of girls

ASSQ-GIRL item No Somewhat Yes

  1. Copies you (can be in a very discrete way)
  2. Episodes of eating problems
  3. No time perception*
  4. Too much sympathy
  5. Extremely interested in pop/ rock bands, soap operas or natural disasters
  6. Avoids demands*
  7. 34 Very determined*
  8. 35 Difficulties with choice; always avoids choosing
  9. 36 Difficulties with self-care*
  10. 37 Carefree or overmeticulous as regards physical appearance/dress
  11. Naïve
  12. Comes too close to others
  13.  Interacts mostly with younger children*
  14. Engages in dangerous activities
  15. Exaggeratedly fanciful
  16. Talks without content*
  17. Writes long stories (can be in stark contrast to level of talk)
  18. Acts or lives different parts (TV stars, videos, animals)

Note. *indicates items which were considered most specific in girls with ASD (see study V)

Aspienwomanjune2015cover

I Am AspienWoman is due for release September 2015 and available for preorder at http://www.aspiengirl.com

cropped-all-books-with-award.jpg3To contact Tania for assessments, Skype or clinic consultations, problem solving sessions, workshops and presentations, book interviews, book translations, or publishing, please contact Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

For more information about Autism Spectrum Conditions in females go to:

http://www.taniamarshall.com and http://www.aspiengirl.com

Copyright Tania A. Marshall 2015

Adult Autism/Asperger Syndrome Assessment in Females

Adult Autism Assessment in Females 
Updated 23/01/2021

Autism spectrum conditions, including Asperger’s syndrome, are challenging to identify in adults. Without appropriate assessment, many individuals may go undiagnosed, without appropriate support and treatment.

Many girls and women are going undiagnosed or misdiagnosed because the majority of the research has been conducted on males and there is a great need of research based on females compared to NT females, research based assessment tools for females and interventions for females. There is also a great need for these tools to be made readily accessible to professionals, in other countries and other languages. At present, there are few professionals in the world both trained and experienced in assessing and/or working with females on the Spectrum, across the lifespan. At this point in my career, I have worked with hundreds, closer to 1,000 females, from ages 18 months to 78 years of age, of various sub-types, symptomatology, mild to severe traits, a variety of levels of Giftedness, many professional performers (singers, musicians, comedians, actors, models), professionals athletes, professional artists, professional authors, high-profile individuals, all at different points on the Social Spectrum, some with gender dysphoria, some with sexual fluidity, parenting and being a mother, being in trouble with the law, stalking and obsessiveness, working in the sex trade, being sectioned into a mental health facility (and the experiences that go with that), have work-related challenges, and much more.

Females with Autism or Aspergers may be picked up for Autism in the teenage years with depression, anxiety or an eating disorder, if they are at all. Many females exist who are undiagnosed or misdiagnosed and continuing to have mental health problems because of this. Some are diagnosed with Borderline Personality Disorder, which may or may not be appropriate, although many have BPD traits, and I have worked with individuals who have both. For adults, no-one knew of Asperger Syndrome or Autism back in their childhood. So a comprehensive early childhood and teenage autobiographical account is an extremely important piece of an assessment. In addition, other perspectives from people who know the person very well are important. A comprehensive assessment of an adult can include a variety of assessment tools, depending on the person. It also involves childhood photographs, report cards and comments, parental and/or partner perspectives, formal assessment tool(s) and an exploration of abilities, talents and/or gifts.

The vast majority of women I work with are on the bright end of the Spectrum, and tell me their reasons for seeking a diagnosis range from self-understanding and awareness to improving their relationships, to improving their works relationships, to treating their anxiety and or depressive episodes. and are not seeking services, support, nor government support pension or services. They are wanting to know why they have “felt different” for so long, wanting to know what career is best for them, wanting to know how to structure their lives. They don’t want to be on government disability not do they see they value in that. They like working, want to work and contribute.

Presently there are ZERO adult assessment tools for females, very little research that is based on females and no specific research based interventions for females. This is a crisis for females. It is challenging for females to find a professional or organization familiar with the female autism research, how to assess females and then how to support them.

When I conduct impressions assessments, the assessment of adults explore the areas of social communication and interaction, repetitive and stereotypical behaviour, sensory issues and abilities or gifts. Feedback is provided, recommendations, highly recommended resources and a “What Next?” discussion is also involved.

Generally speaking, my comprehensive adult diagnostic impressions assessments include the following:

An autobiographical account from earliest memories until approximately age 25 (usually 4 pages)
A written or typed account of why you feel you might have female Autism/Asperger Syndrome
A 10-page Life History Questionnaire to go over various traits, and also collect extensive life/educational/employment/psychological history, developmental information.
Where possible, I interview family members, a partner, or any other family member or friend who know the person very well. I also base my diagnosis on my direct experience of how the person presents during the interviews. Non-verbal body language, facial expressions, the sound of the voice and intonations are all assessed.
An interview exploring present day context and day to day functioning
An exploration of the following is important:
 
Family history, including one’s own children (if any), who may be displaying traits or be formally diagnosed.
History of mental health issues, previous medical, psychiatric, psychological and psycho-educational history (previous IQ test and/or educational assessments), previous diagnoses and/or learning disabilities
Reading of previous reports, letters, hospital admission notes, medical, educational reports
Educational history
Social communication and relationship/friendship history, use of social compensatory strategies
Identity or persona (s)
A thorough exploration of compensatory strategies
A sensory processing assessment
Work history
School report cards, school/teacher comments
Childhood photos from each developmental stage
Abilities, gifts, strengths, talents and/or skills (some examples include samples of poetry, art, blog, short stories, books, singing and/or musical ability, acting, comedy routine, degrees and/or thesis/dissertation work, samples of jewellery, clothing or costumes, website, awards and so on)
Over-excitabilities, sensory sensitivities, self-soothing or stimming behaviors, sensory processing disorder and/or synaethesia
An exploration of visual, auditory, taste, touch, smell, balance, movement and intuitive differences, synaethesia and hyper empathy.
1-3 other perspectives from other persons who know the person really well
An exploration of personal journal entries, autobiographical and/or blog entries
Results of specific adult Autism assessment tools and other tools, completed by the person and also dependent on the person being assessed and the context
Other conditions (for example,  Central Auditory Processing, Irlen Syndrome, Ehlers Danlos Syndrome,  Hypermobility type Syndrome, food allergies)
Formal diagnostic tool(s) depend on the context of client. Research has shown that both the DSM5 and the ADOS are not very good at picking up the subtle characteristics of females on the Spectrum.
It is imperative that professionals learn to ASK females the right questions. These questions will vary from questions that would be asked of males. This is because we research is finally beginning to catch up with clinical experience, telling is what we as clinicians have know for years, that males and females present differently, in quite a few ways. Giftedness also impacts on the presentation of a female on the Spectrum, so professionals need to be aware of all levels of Giftedness and how they affect the assessment process.
It is also imperative that clinicians use a wide variety of listening and communication techniques to ensure they are on the same page as the client. Therefore, as an extension of excellent communication and listening skills, you need to develop the ability to reflect words, meaning and feelings and to clarify that you have understood them correctly.

So, when someone receives a diagnosis, what then?
A positive assessment or diagnosis is just the beginning.It is never to late to receive a diagnosis and the benefits outweigh any disadvantages.

While my diagnosis is based on the current DSM-5 Criteria, it is by no means a cut and dry process. The DSM is a working document and as such, does not accomodate well to females on the Spectrum.

Diagnosis, ultimately from my perspective, is best done when in collaboration with the client (and their partner or spouse when relevant) as a way to inform, educate, reflect and empower.

An important  “What Next” section is very important, and may or may not involve the following,  again dependent on the person, their situation and context of their life. Discussions of the following may include:
Self awareness and understanding
Education and highly recommended resources (including the best academic books, websites, research, researchers, webinars, etc)
Neurodivergent affirming approach
Attitude
Strengths
Challenges
Recommended helpful therapy
The Social Spectrum
Referral to other professionals, professional support groups, etc.
Many adults have lived and died not knowing they had Autism or Asperger syndrome. Some benefits of an adult diagnosis include:
Knowledge and self-understanding of oneself and also for family members, friends, co-workers and/or partners
Access to appropriate therapy, medication, support and services
An answer for past experiences and challenges
Permission to ease up on oneself
Possible prevention of other conditions or disorders (i.e., personality disorders, difficulties distinguishing between reality and fantasy), difficulties with work, the law and court system and/or suicide
Prevention of mis-directed treatment
Learning about how one thinks (see the Autistic Brain, by Dr. Temple Grandin)
Identifying strengths, abilities and gifts
There are both benefits and costs to disclosing a diagnosis. Disclosure should be considered thoughtfully and used only if there is is potential benefit.
Who should I look for to help me? How can I find someone to help me?
Today, there are few professionals in the world trained and experienced in assisting females. At this time, the most important factor to look at is “Does the professional have both experience and training in the area of female autism”? Are they aware of the inherent gender bias? What types of assessment tools do they use? What is involved in an assessment? Do they use adult assessment tools? (Yes, I have had two clients tell me that child assessment tools were used on them).
I have developed a database of professionals who work with females which can be found at and is being updated on a regular basis at http://taniamarshall.com/female-asc-professionals.html
Please contact me at aspiengirl@gmail.com if you or you know of someone who would like to be added to this database.
Common Pathways to an assessment or diagnosis
Having a child being assessed or who is formally diagnosed with  Autism
Difficulties with work or a current relationship
Discovering and learning about female Autism, aka self-diagnosis
A family member has recently or in the past received a diagnosis
Stalking and/or becoming involved in other criminal activities
Spending time in jail or a mental health facility
Being involved with criminal proceedings
I have read your writings and book I Am AspienGirl and it fit like a glove. Can you provide an assessment for me?
Yes, Tania regularly provides comprehensive impressions assessments across the lifespan. The vast majority of adults (both male and female) Tania has assisted are wanting a self-diagnosis confirmed formally. She is also in touch with other professionals who work in this area and also regularly refers to other appropriate professionals at the appropriate time. She can be reached at aspiengirl@gmail.com
I really identify with the writings available on female Autism but I am not sure I want a diagnosis? Is Tania available to for sessions other than assessment?
Yes, Tania regularly provides services which may focus on assessment, diagnosis, problem solving, the pros and cons of a diagnosis, the pros and cons of disclosure, career directions, managing stress, anxiety, sensory sensitivities, “What Next” after a diagnosis, the different types of Autistic thinking, gender dysphoria, social difficulties and social skills, relationship difficulties, synaethesia, hyperempathy and the topic of being an “empath”.
For more information about the adult female phenotype, the sequel to the eLIT Gold Medal Award winning I am AspienGirl, entitled I Am AspienWoman: The Characteristics, Traits and Abilities of Adult Females on the Autism Spectrum is in press and due for release September 2015 and is based on her blog entitled “Aspienwomen: Adult Women with Asperger Syndrome. Moving towards a female profile of Asperger Syndrome”

Tania A. Marshall is an award winning and best selling author, a 2019, 2016 and 2015  ASPECT Autism Australia National Recognition Awards Nominee (Advancement category) and a psychologist. Her first book, I Am AspienGirl: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Females on the Autism Spectrum, Foreword by Judith Gould, UK, is an Amazon best-seller and a 2015 IPPY eLIT Gold Medal Book Award Winner.

I Am AspienGirl has been translated into both Spanish and Italian (release dates of July and August 2015 respectively).

Tania has completed the sequel to I Am AspienGirl, entitled “I am AspienWoman: The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Strengths of Females on the Autism Spectrum, foreword by Dr Shana Nichols (lead author of Girls Growing up on the Autism Spectrum). The release was 2015. This book includes a section of 24 females, all diagnosed as on the Spectrum, showcasing their strengths and also offering important advice to others. Tania is proud to announce that her 2nd book “I Am AspienWoman” recently won an IPPY eLIT Gold Medal in the “Women’s Issues” category.

Tania is an Australian psychological society (APS) autism identified medicare provider,
helping children with autism (HCWA) early intervention service provider, a better start early intervention provider and an Australian government medicare approved mental health provider. She is also a trained Secret Agent Society (SAS) social skills practitioner.

Tania can be reached at aspiengirl@gmail.com for clinic or Skype remote impressions assessments, consultations, problem solving sessions, skills acquisition and intervention, interviews, book translations, presentations or workshops. She divides her time between busy full-time private practice, research, writing her book series and developing Masterclasses to assist practitioners in assessment, diagnosis and intervention.
Tania’s other books include:
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Female Autism Infographics

Female Autism Infographics to share for awareness and education. More Coming

The following article is copyrighted and may not be posted anywhere without permission from the author.

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For more information go to:

http://www.aspiengirl.com

http://www.taniamarshall.com

To contact Tania regarding consultations, assessment, problem-solving strategies, Skype consultations, book distribution, interviews, book translations, publishing queries, please email her at tania@aspiengirl.com

Young Female Autism: Commonly Observed Characteristics, Traits and Gifts

Commonly Observed Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Young girls and Teens with Autism Spectrum Conditions

The following article is copyrighted and may not be posted anywhere without permission from the author.

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Tania A. Marshall is a 2015 ASPECT Autism Australia National Recognition Award Nominee (Advancement Category) for her work in advancing the field of female autism. Her first book was recently awarded a 2015 eLIT Independent Publishers IPPY Gold Medal Award. Tania is available to provide assessment, diagnostic impressions, referrals, intervention, problem solving and/or support in person or via Skype or other means. She is also available for interviews and presentations and can be contacted at tania@aspiengirl.com

For more information, go to:

http://www.taniamarshall.com

http://www.aspiengirl.com

Predictors of Success Factors: A Phenomenological Pilot Study of Females with Asperger Syndrome Pilot Study

Predictors of Success Factors: A Phenomenological Pilot Study of Females with Asperger Syndrome Pilot Study (2013-2014)

In early 2014, Dr. Amanda Webster and I were involved in a Pilot Study entitled “Predictors of Success Factors: A Phenomenological Pilot Study of Females with Asperger Syndrome Pilot Study”

We wanted to first interview a small group of females diagnosed with Autism within Australia, with the exclusion criteria being that no participant was assessed or diagnosed by either Dr. Webster or myself. The goal was to then to interview a much larger group in a variety of other countries.

Brief project description

Details

There exists a great need to understand Asperger Syndrome/Autism from the point of view of the adult female, diagnosed with the condition. So far, research has mainly focused on the male presentation. This pilot project aims to give females with Autism a voice, through telling their lived experience/stories.

The primary outcome of this pilot study is to begin identifying internal and/or external factors or predictors that were crucial in leading females with Asperger Syndrome to achieve success in life. This project is designed to capture the meaning of several adult females of their lived experience of Autism. The outcome of this study will be achieved through interviewing adult females who have a formal diagnosis of Autism. Females will participate through the use of telling or sharing their story about living with Autism. The participants will describe their experiences of living as a female, with Autism, in writing, or spoken form. In particular, what helped or hindered them in their life journey, to date, in terms of having a successful life.

Information gathered will be used to develop early intervention recommendations, provide knowledge and information about Autism in adult females including: assessment and diagnosis, late diagnoses, benefits of earlier diagnoses, the need for and the barriers to accessing diagnosis and interventions/therapies, accessible and affordable  interventions.

Inclusion criteria: Must not be known to either researchers in a professional way, must have had a formal diagnosis prior to participating in the Pilot Study by a professional other than the researchers.

E3. Participants

Details The target participant group is adult females with a formal diagnosis of Autism (Asperger Syndrome), in Australia. Individuals within the target group will be invited to participate in interviews over a three month period (late September  to December, 2013). Advertisements will be placed on Facebook, in Australian Autism groups or organizations.

E4. Data collection

Details A phemenological inquiry method similar to that used by Moustakas (1994) to gather stories from adult women, will be utilised to gather information from females with Asperger Syndrome. The Griffith research team will introduce themselves and provide a general overview of the project. Individuals will be provided with information sheets about the project including discussion topics. Participants will also be informed that a sound recording will be made of the interviews for transcription purposes only. Time will be given for participants to discuss and ask questions about the information provided.  Participants will also be given the option of scheduling an individual session at a location of their choice or of telling their story in written form and submitting this by e-mail or post to the research team. To get at the essential meaning of the experience, abstracting out of themes will occur. This will continue until a full abstraction and presentation of themes essential to the participants lived experience. Only then can we be able to present the unique experience in a way that is understandable & recognizable to other adult females with Asperger Syndrome. Any individual differences will be noted (for e.g., a participant(s) may be gay or transgender, and this would represent individual differences within the group. We aim to glean the essences of being a participant with Autism.

E5. Informed consent

Details The interviews will only proceed if the participants provides their full and informed written consent. It will be made clear to all participants that they are welcome to remove themselves from the research process, at any time. It will also be made clear that all identifying information will be removed from the information collected before it is analysed and published. Publications will only occur with participant’s full and informed consent. If participants feel their information should not be used, we will organise for their information to be destroyed or returned to them.

E6. Communication of results / reporting

Details Following examination and analysis of transcripts, participants will be invited to follow-up meetings organised by the Griffith research team, to discuss the findings and obtain feedback.

From these meetings and/or interviews,

The information may also be published in peer-reviewed journals and in a book highlighting the stories presented.

POSSIBLE QUESTIONS INCLUDED:

  1. Please tell me what your formal diagnosis is and any co-existing conditions.
  1. Please tell me about what the process was like for you, in terms of getting your formal diagnosis.
  1. Please tell me how your life has been since your formal diagnoses, as opposed to how your life was before you were diagnosed. Please be detailed in your description as possible.
  1. Please tell me about any significant mentors or positive events in your life. How did they make a difference?
  1. Please tell me about any significant negative people or negative events in your life. How did they make a difference or contribute to where you are now in your life? Please be detailed in your description.
  1. Tell me how you function in a world full of Neurotypicals. Please provide a full description of your experience, including your thoughts, feelings, images, sensations, memories, along with a description of the situation in which your experience occurred.
  1. What context or situations have typically affected or influenced your experience of Autism?
  1. Tell me the affect that Autism has had on your lived experience?
  1. What is the experience of living with Autism like?
  1. How did the idea that you had Autism come about? What was the experience of the assessment process and the ultimate diagnosis like for you? What was it like telling others about it? How did you announce or tell others about Autism? How long time wise did it take you to accept the diagnosis? Or, had you always somehow just known, and receiving the diagnosis just solidified it for you?
  1. In what way are the themes of males different from females?
  1. Please describe, in detail, a situation or event in which you felt was significantly altered the course or outcome of your life, to date. Be as specific and detailed as possible.
  1. How has your diagnosis altered or impacted your life? Positively? Negatively? Describe in detail any changes that occurred post-diagnosis.
  1. Describe what have you experienced, in terms of a female adult, living with Asperger Syndrome?
  1. Tell me about accessing intervention/therapy post-diagnosis.

Research Questions

How do the participants describe their experiences of living with Autism?

How do the participants understand and make sense of their experiences of Autism?

How are individual differences reflected in the participants accounts of their experiences of Autism, (late diagnosis)?

How do women with a late diagnosis of Autism describe their lived experiences of Autism?

What is the nature of the experience of being an adult female with a late diagnosis of Autism?

What is it about being female and having Autism versus being male with Autism?

References

Moustakas, C. (1994). Phenomenological research Methods. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage

This Pilot Study has now concluded

To reach Tania, please contact her at tania@aspiengirl.com

For more information about female autism please visit:

http://www.aspiengirl.com

http://www.taniamarshall.com

Hello, from Team Aspiengirl to you. Have an enjoyable Holiday season from us to you. Massive eBook sale on starting NOW at 75% off!

Hello, from Team Aspiengirl to you. Have an enjoyable Holiday season from us to you.

Massive eBook sale on starting NOW at 75% off, 1/2 off the Amazon bookstore prices. eBooks only! This is www.aspiengirl.com‘s cheapest female autism/autism eBook sale starting now on ALL Aspiengirl eBooks from the Series, released and pre-orders, at www.aspiengirl.com, including I Am Aspiengirl, I Am Aspienwoman Book, Aspienpowers Book and I Am AspienBoy Book Series at www.aspiengirl.com. The sale is guaranteed cheaper than Amazon prices and is valid for the Christmas limited time period, as a thank-you for all your support in 2014. Each individual eBook is 75% off, so that’s $5.00 AUD per e-book. If you order all 3, which are regularly $44.99, you will receive I Am AspienGirl immediately and the 2 pre-orders of I am a AspienWoman and AspienPowers later, all 3 e-books for $11.25 AUD!*****

Please go to http://www.aspiengirl.com/ebookspecial
CODEWORD: ebook

If for any reason the link within your receipt does not work, please email us at tania@aspiengirl.com and we will fix it as soon as possible.

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Don’t forget out brand new Planet Aspien App full of resources from radio interviews to 3 developmental female Asperger Syndrome screeners to meditations, to our blog to Be Your Own Superhero Project (BYOSP), to free book sample chapters, and weekly updates by Team AspienGirl’s webmaster, only $1.29

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We wish you the best of holidays and remember “Be Your Own Superhero”

Team AspienGirl

http://www.aspiengirl.com

http://www.taniamarshall.com

I Am AspienGirl reaches Amazon Australia #1 rank in 3 categories

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The AspienGirl Project is pleased to announce that the I Am AspienGirl® book is now #1 on Amazon Australia in 3 different categories. Thank-you to everyone who purchased a copy. The book was released on June 20th as an eBook. Both paperback and Special Edition hardcover versions are coming soon. The book is currently being translated into Norwegian, Spanish and Italian. Furthur translations will become available this coming year.

You can your copy at www.aspiengirl.com, Amazon or other bookstores! Please leave a review on Amazon if you like the book:-)

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The following are the Amazon rankings:

Amazon Bestsellers Rank: #1,983 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
#1 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Parenting & Relationships > Special Needs > Disabilities
#1 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Health, Fitness & Dieting > Counselling > Pathologies > Autism
#1 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Health, Fitness & Dieting > Personal Health > Women’s Health

 

 

 

For more information on the author:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/taniamarshallauthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TaniaAMarshall

Pinterest: https://pinterest.com/taniaamarshall

WordPress: https://taniaannmarshall.wordpress.com

LinkedIn: au.linkedin.com/in/taniaannmarshall/

 

AspienGIRL can be found at:

Website: http://www.aspiengirl.com   

Amazon: www.amazon.com/author/taniamarshall

Facebook: www.facebook.com/AspienGIRL

Twitter: https://twitter.com/aspiengirlVIP