Assessing the behaviors, traits and abilities of young females on the Autism Spectrum

Assessing the behaviors, traits and abilities of young females on the Autism Spectrum: For professionals and parents

Girls with high functioning Autism (Asperger Syndrome) often have subtler characteristics that lead them to be missed by professionals. Many (not all) are able to use compensatory strategies to mask their difficulties and these are learned from before they start grade school. Autism tends to be a condition of extremes; an either/or condition in which two girls who present quite differently can both be on the Spectrum. For example, one is shy, quiet and mute and the other is loud, has a lack of boundaries and talks too much. The both have social communication and interaction difficulties.

Girls on the Spectrum may present as shy, quiet and at times mute, taking a long time to warm up to situations or they may present as overly talkative, verbal and lacking boundaries.

The quiet girl can be described as passive, a follower, watching and observing her peers much of the time to learn what to say or how to act. She is very shy in social situations. The verbal girl is often dominating, described as “bossy and controlling”, often described as having to have the best at everything and have her own way. She dominates and controls social situations.

Both girls may not receive many birthday invites, prefer one or two close friends, prefer to play with younger or older children rather than their peers, prefer to talk to boys or have boys as friends.

The quiet type may be attracted to extraverted personalities who tell her what to do or are controlling towards her due to her passivity and shyness. The verbal type may be domineering and controlling in her interactions with others.

Why do girls who have an assessment not receive a diagnosis?

Females can and do make eye contact and can have superficial reciprocal conversations in initial interviews with professionals.

Females are reluctant to admit they are having difficulty and will say they have friends, that they know what to do socially, when they are actually socially confused

Females start learning, often from before grade school to camouflage their difficulties and pretend every thing is fine

Females will say everything is ok and there are no problems even in the face of contrary evidence or difficulties

Professionals are viewing the female as just a “shy” and/or “sensitive” child or a “hormone driven” teenager, when in fact they have Autism. Around the age of 12-13 are when the proverbial wheels may begin to fall off and the inability to cope comes to the forefront

Professionals may diagnose only the presenting issue (for e.g., anxiety disorder)

They may receive high scores on the ADOS but not enough for a diagnosis

The majority of assessment tools are based on males

Professionals are not trained in understanding the gender differences, the gender bias, the questions to ask, compensatory strategies and camouflaging techniques

Some clues look for in an assessment

The Social World

1. exaggerated facial mannerism or a flatter affect. Many girls I have worked with have a slight grimace to their smile. This is a clue that they may be having difficulties with their own non-verbal body language. Many childhood photos reveal either no smiling or a slight exaggerated smile or facial expressions

2. look for facial expressions not matching the mood or the situation being discussed. For example, it is common to observe smiling or laughing whilst talking about a situation that would usually be associated with a different emotion (and therefore a different facial expression and tone of voice).

3. many girls say they know what to do in a social situation but when asked, are not able to tell you what they would do or give an answer that leads to to believe otherwise. An investigation into levels and types of friendships and social skills often reveals difficulties

4. exaggerated non-verbal body language is often a clue. Some girls present in the clinic with body language that appears “odd”, unnatural or like they are acting with you in a conversation.

5. Many females are well-behaved (often too well-behaved) in school but the opposite at home (due to social exhaustion and holding it all in)

6. Many females are observed using behaviors or words from their peers, other people or television. They may copy, look like or act like others, taking on the characteristics, mannerisms, voice, sayings, of others.

7. Many females present in different ways depending on the situation and this can be confusing to family members.

8. Many females will tell you they know what to do in social situations, but the evidence is contrary and/or you will get the impression that they are confused or are not being truthful.

9. Some females may not apologize when they have made a social error and some females over-apologize due to being confused about social rules. Some females refuse to apologize even when it is plainly obvious it would be in their best interests to do so.

10. Many females are able to socialize quite well for small periods of time but them experience social exhaustion or a ‘social hangover’, needing solitude to recharge her batteries.

The Play World

1. Some girls have a preference to play with stereotypical boys toys, having no interest in dolls whilst others have an obsessive-like quality towards dolls and stereotypical girls toys (for e.g., collecting all barbie dolls).

2. Girls can often be observed spending the majority of their time putting together the scene of play, rather that actually playing. For example, spending the majority of time ensuring all the furniture, accessories and dolls are in the right place). They often have elaborate scenes of play set up and organized.

3. Whilst playing on their own, girls are often observed to be role-playing adults. For example, a girl may set up all her teddy bears bears, dolls, etc., and role play the teacher, doctor, nurse or other role. She may take attendance, give time-outs, write out lesson plans and/or teach class lessons.

4. Girls on the Spectrum are often far more imaginative than their peers. They are often observed pretending to be animals and/or imitating them. They may also have some difficulty distinguishing between reality and fantasy

5. A tendency to have imaginary friends and/or animals who are very real to the child, to the point that they may have table settings for them at the table, seats for them in the car, and so on.

6. Girls often spend more time playing with the family pets and/or on nature than their peers, having a natural affinity/gift in the areas of nature and animals. It is the intensity of the interest as compared to neurotypical peers that is key here.

7. May have obsessions with other people which can be observed as too clingy, not allowing the friend to have other friends, not giving them enough ‘space’, or obsessing over them

8. Females tend to have more avoidance traits and strategies when demands are placed on them

9. Some females may flitter from group to group in school not really having any real friends but giving the appearance of having friends, so that no one would pick up on this

Abilities, Gifts and Talents

Abilities, Gifts and Talents are plural due to the many females I have met who display multiple talents. These abilities often include:

hyperlexia/reading ability, perfect or near-perfect pitch, languages, art, performing arts (dance, acting/drama, singing, musical theatre, modelling, involvement in a band, comedy), the care of animals, mathematics, writing fiction and/or fan-fiction and/or poetry and/or songwriting, intelligence,

Mature interests may include interests advanced for her age (philosophy, psychology, opera, a language)

Immature interests may include an interest well past her developmental age (for example, my little pony, doll or teddy bear collections).

Some presentations

Some females present as more of a “tomboy” appearance (preferring an androgynous clothing style) and disliking make-up and sterotypical girls clothing

Some females present as a “ultra-feminine” or “princess” like appearance (love make-up, fashion, trends and shoes). they may spends time involved in shopping for clothes and/or designing clothes, perfecting the art of makeup and.or modelling

Regardless of presentation, a difference in terms of clothing as compared to her peers is usually observed. My screener which was the basis of I Am AspienGirlL The Unique Characteristics, Traits and Gifts of Females on the Autism Spectrum is here:

https://taniaannmarshall.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/moving-towards-a-female-profile-the-unique-characteristics-abilities-and-talents-of-young-girls-with-asperger-syndrome/

A female autism assessment tool I often use in conjuction with other tools includes this screening questionnaire developed by Kopp and Gilberg and it is excellent.

THE AUTISM SPECTRUM SCREENING QUESTIONNAIRE (ASSQ)-REVISED EXTENDED VERSION (ASSQ-REV), by Kopp and Gilberg

Kopp and Gilberg found that certain single ASSQ-GIRL items are often much more typical of girls than of boys with ASC. These items include “avoids demands”, “very determined” and “interacts mostly with younger children”. The ASSQ-REV is a new assessment tool that includes a set of “girl” items.

ASSQ-GIRL, 18 new screening items believed to tap into the autism phenotype of girls

ASSQ-GIRL item No Somewhat Yes

  1. Copies you (can be in a very discrete way)
  2. Episodes of eating problems
  3. No time perception*
  4. Too much sympathy
  5. Extremely interested in pop/ rock bands, soap operas or natural disasters
  6. Avoids demands*
  7. 34 Very determined*
  8. 35 Difficulties with choice; always avoids choosing
  9. 36 Difficulties with self-care*
  10. 37 Carefree or overmeticulous as regards physical appearance/dress
  11. Naïve
  12. Comes too close to others
  13.  Interacts mostly with younger children*
  14. Engages in dangerous activities
  15. Exaggeratedly fanciful
  16. Talks without content*
  17. Writes long stories (can be in stark contrast to level of talk)
  18. Acts or lives different parts (TV stars, videos, animals)

Note. *indicates items which were considered most specific in girls with ASD (see study V)

Aspienwomanjune2015cover

I Am AspienWoman is due for release September 2015 and available for preorder at http://www.aspiengirl.com

cropped-all-books-with-award.jpg3To contact Tania for assessments, Skype or clinic consultations, problem solving sessions, workshops and presentations, book interviews, book translations, or publishing, please contact Tania at tania@aspiengirl.com

For more information about Autism Spectrum Conditions in females go to:

http://www.taniamarshall.com and http://www.aspiengirl.com

Copyright Tania A. Marshall 2015

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5 thoughts on “Assessing the behaviors, traits and abilities of young females on the Autism Spectrum

  1. This is amazing! So much of this discribes my daughter (diagnosed at 16 yrs old). Wish we had this tool earlier.

  2. Pingback: School Rollercoaster | Common Sense

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